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  1. #1

    importing inkscape svg's (with gradients, alpha and outline values intact)

    I can import from inkscape into blender just fine, except for the:
    -outlines, alpha values and gradients
    of the paths being imported.

    (Of course I can export the svg as bitmap and add it as a texture to the imported object in blender, but I would like to avoid that if possible (for lots of good reasons, not just to save time))

    has anyone had any success with this ?

    thanks,
    baby turtle

    http://babyturtlefilms.blogspot.com/



  2. #2
    Member mzungu's Avatar
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    btf: the fact that these extra features of SVG files are not imported into Blender is a natural result of the inherent difference of what blender is all about compared to Inkscape (or most any other 2D vector graphics app.) The geometry will import, because that's really the only thing that's common to both sides. I suppose these extra 2d elements of SVGs could somehow be "interpreted" or "translated" into blender elements, but that would mean the import script author making a lot of assumptions as to how the user wants things to be constructed on the blender side.

    For example: line thickness. Blender doesn't have a correlating feature to describe the "thickness" of individual line segments at either display or render. Thus, the import script author would have to come up with a way (one of many possible approaches) to correlate this feature of imported lines. Better to just leave it up to the individual users to choose their own methods within blender on the imported geometry.
    - mzungu
    The agnostic dislexic insomniac: lies awake in bed at night wondering if there really is a dog.
    "A man convinced against his will is of the same opinion still." - Dale Carnegie



  3. #3

    thanks

    cool, thanks, that makes sense...

    I'll just texture them in, and found a nice way to display the texture by pressing shift-t in 3d view mode.



  4. #4
    Member mzungu's Avatar
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    There is a lot that can be done to blender's output to make it have a "2D feel". Toon shading and edges, pencil sketch look from nodes, even a current GSOC project to incorporate the hand-painted edges of the Freestyle app - all can be leveraged to put out great looking 2D-like artwork. I encourage you, if you've not done so already, to do a bit of searching on this forum and over at blendernation for topics and discussions related to these things. You'll find lots of resources, tutes and help to boost your blenderbliss™ well beyond socially acceptable levels!

    Cheers...
    - mzungu
    The agnostic dislexic insomniac: lies awake in bed at night wondering if there really is a dog.
    "A man convinced against his will is of the same opinion still." - Dale Carnegie



  5. #5
    There's a blender plug-in called vectex for SVG textures.



  6. #6
    N3oN, did you use Vectex, I'm desperate to find some other user since a couple of days



  7. #7
    Originally Posted by ray.n.baud View Post
    N3oN, did you use Vectex, I'm desperate to find some other user since a couple of days
    Yes I have (even made a package for my preferred distro). I have just found your post regarding vectex, the message you got from the test-static.blend file is quite normal. Are you specifying the full path to the SVG file you are trying to load (eg. /home/user/Desktop/foo.svg)?



  8. #8
    That was exactly it, but I already had found out and reported it here
    where you can share that experience with us (what advantage did you get from building etc...)
    thanks anyway!



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