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  1. #1
    Member Consideringthepickle's Avatar
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    Nemusidian in Cruise Ship Catastrophe

    Hi, I'm working on a short film with Blender. Nemusidian in Cruise Ship Catastrophe will be an under 9 minute animated film about a young thief who finds herself aboard a cruise ship in a precarious situation.

    This is a film I've been wanting to make for a long time. It's my first animation work at what I hope will be a high quality level. Also my first real film, although I've been studying filmmaking for many years, primarily writing scripts. So, the story for this short was designed in order to give me practice with a number of technical challenges, character animation, cloth, hair, explosions, physics, etc. My primary focus is on the animation. The story is pretty simple. It's basically a big chase around a cruise ship and havoc ensues after she steals a wedding ring.

    Below is the layout pass for the first scene:

    Everything is still mock-up and will be replaced later with the finished models and lighting. The main purpose of the layout is to get a sense of the timing and framing. So that's what I'm looking for feedback on from this. All of the animation will be replaced during the blocking stage so you can ignore the rough quality and all the weighting issues.

    In this scene she’s just woken up and found herself in this room with people sleeping all over the floor and empty bottles and things and is sneaking away towards the door when a glint from the dresser catches her eye and she goes over to check out this shiny ring (I indicated the glint effect with some scaling and rotation, but that'll be replaced with the actual lighting effects in the final version. The first shot will have a lens flare too that's not there presently).

    While examining the ring she sees a shadow behind her from the corner of her eye and quickly spins around drawing her pistol (not present in the layout yet -it's just her hand) but it's just someone rolling over in their sleep and knocking a bottle around. Then a knock at the door draws her attention and knocks a bottle off the dresser which crashes and causes her to turn to the man in the bed, where we'll see him waking up in the mirror behind her. Then she pockets the ring and bolts before the door opens and the room stirs to life. And we end the scene panning on the open window to suggest that that's where she made her escape.

    ->I should also add here, that the movie is going to be silent (Music only. No dialog. No sound effects) -because I wanted to avoid actors and lip syncing so the focus would be completely on the animation. This created a filmmaking challenge. Instead of hearing a a knock at the door, I have to visually represent through animation that there's noise from the door. I think this will be fairly apparent from her head spinning to look at it and the bottle crashing, but I might also add some animation of the door shaking or other objects if it doesn't read as well.

    I also noticed another change I need to make just uploading this. When she first pulls her gun and we cut to the bottle rolling I think it should actually cut to the person who's just rolled over so we know they're still asleep. Let me know if anything else doesn't read as well for you too. Getting new eyes on this will be incredibly helpful.


    If you'd like to read the script I’ve included the first page that corresponds to this scene here for reference: Nemusidian Cruise Ship Page 1 I might share more of the script as the production progresses going forward if there's interest.

    I explain the storyboarding process I went through for this scene in detail over at the production blog: http://nemusidian.wordpress.com/2013...n-storyboards/

    Here's a WIP render of Nemusidian and the BA thread I started for her character: http://blenderartists.org/forum/show...for-Short-Film
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I intend to keep the two threads separate and put everything related to her design in that thread and keep this one focused on the animation and the movie as a whole.


    ----Technical Challenges:--------
    1. Cloth Settings for Linked Objects -In addition to getting this layout done I've been spending time working out a lot of the technical issues that have to be dealt with such as the workflow for hair and cloth. Currently there is no way to access simulation settings on linked objects in Blender. This is a problem if you want to, for instance, have a character file with all the object data and armature, and then link it into each scene. Under current functionality you can only make a proxy (local-ish version) of the armature for that character, which is fine for most things, but for cloth simulation and other physics simulations like hair will undoubtedly have to be tweaked on a per shot basis. So getting access to those settings for linked objects would be a lot of help.
    I've been in contact with Brecht and Bassam Kurdali. Brecht has been very generous and shared a snippet of some code that might be a start to a workaround, and Bassam said he would post his methodology for this that he's using on his Tube project. On the open movie project Durian they had a hard-coded script for this that was production specific, but I'd like to find a more generic and user-friendly solution. Unfortunately, although I'm planning to learn python in the near future I am not a coder yet, and my focus is on getting this movie made. This isn't a showstopper afterall. I will probably end up simply appending the cloth objects separately for each shot, but it's not ideal.
    I started a thread focused on this issue here: http://blenderartists.org/forum/show...ation-Settings

    2. Rigging the Shoulder Bag -A second problem I'm working to solve right now is rigging her shoulder pack. It's going to be around her shoulder most of the movie, but as you can see in the layout she does need to be able to take it off. I'm trying to find a solution that will automate the animation for it bouncing about against her hip as much as possible, perhaps using cloth or rigid bodies in combination with an armature. But that's a challenge I'm still trying to solve so if you have any ideas that'd be a help.


    Finally, if you're on Facebook or Google+, and you like what you see, it would really mean a lot if you could please give it a Like or a Follow:
    http://facebook.com/nemusidian
    https://plus.google.com/b/1082440746...19393988/posts

    You can also follow me directly on Twitter if you'd like, where I tweet updates regularly: http://twitter.com/mikhailpschalk

    And you can also follow the production blog directly here: http://nemusidian.wordpress.com

    Okay, I think I covered all the points I wanted to hit. Long post, so thanks for reading. I'd love to hear from you what you think so far. And if I missed anything or if you have any questions please let me know. Thanks.



  2. #2
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    So you have a young girl, described as a thief, waking after a pre-wedding orgy on a cruise ship, who opportunistically steals the wedding ring while sneaking away from the scene of the orgy while everyone is still asleep. And she is armed.

    Since this is the first scene, you need an establishing shot. Maybe start with the cruise ship, zoom in on the port hole, camera enters the port hole and looks around, then focus in on our hero. Or start in a foyer inside the ship with a hallway leading to the stateroom where the action starts. Or just start with a pan of the stateroom, with drunken sleeping bodies laying around.

    Next, you need to establish Nemu as a sympathetic character, so we root for her during the chase. She has to do something that connects with the audience. I don't think putting her boots on and finding her purse is going to do it. Also there is the theft to deal with. Is it premeditated or opportunistic? Seems opportunistic except that she is armed, and I presume will do some ninja like getaway moves while shooting during the chase, which would argue that she is a professional thief. So, if she is a professional, she needs to be established as a professional and not just some random girl who partied too hard the night before.

    Possibilities: she is not asleep, but faking it, and we can tell because of the way her eyes snap open and look from side to side before she moves right at the beginning. That would help establish her as a professional thief. Also have her deliberately search the room.

    Making her a sympathetic character is a bit harder. Maybe she is buried in a puppy pile of warm drunken half naked bodies, and she carefully extricates herself and sympathetically drapes the girl on her left side over the guy on her right side as she gets out of the pile. Difficult animation. Another possibility, as she is searching the room for the ring, the ship rolls and the empty wine bottles roll with it. One bottle rolls off the table and she grabs it mid-air before it hits the floor, and places it, upright, on the table. A bit easier to animate than the puppy pile scenario. The idea is that she is doing something not completely self-centered to get the audience on her side. Or maybe some cigarettes are still smoldering in an ashtray and she pours the dregs of the wine on them to put them out.

    Maybe those things wouldn't work out, but she needs to do something to set herself up as the hero of the piece.

    I am not sure why, in a room of sleeping people she is trying to sneak out of, or ransack for loot, that she draws and brandishes a gun. If she is sneaking away there is no reason to hold a gun. If she is searching for loot, she will want both hands free. Hearing someone wake up wouldn't do it: these are people she partied with the night before.

    To simply establish that she has a gun as foreshadowing, she could move it from her purse to a holster, perhaps at the small of her back, early James Bond style.

    Anyway, that's my crits: take em or leave em. I'm looking forward to seeing where this goes.
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  3. #3
    Member Consideringthepickle's Avatar
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    I can clarify her character a bit better. She is not a professional thief. She fancies herself one, but she is definitely not a ninja thief by any means. A little bit about her background, it won't be delved into in this short, but I hope to hint at it and draw from it wherever I can. She grew up alone on the streets. So she knows a thing or two about how to get out of situations but she also has a habit of getting herself into situations, like this one. She finds the ring on a whim completely impulsively.

    I would also add she's young, but she's not a child. She's over 18. Though for the record there was no orgy. Everyone was too drunk and fell asleep as soon as they reached the room.

    I like your idea about having her deliberately search the room, but she's also trying to get out of there quickly before the rest of the people wake up. Maybe she misled them the previous night while they were drunk into thinking she was one of their friends to get a bed to sleep in for the night but she's probably a stranger to them. She's a stowaway on this ship and this is how she's been finding places to sleep, because she's too pampered to hide out below deck. She's willing to risk being found out to get a comfier bed.

    Maybe I can tweak the animation a little bit to add in a couple of impulsive acts of theivery, rummaging around, as she's making her way towards the door.

    Making her a sympathetic character is something I've struggled with. We don't see any of this backstory so it has to all be implied through the animation and her actions. I'm open to ideas on this.

    The crux of her character is that she's impulsive and has this mindset that she has to be this great master thief. And she suffers because of it constantly. As soon as she she realizes the door is opening she knows she's gotten herself into a situation. It's sort of like Indiana Jones where he's all cool and tough but he needs to risk it all to go and find the artifacts as soon as you even give him a whiff of it and he gets in over his head and constantly thinks he's on top of things, but isn't at all.

    There's a shot later on when she's being chased where she goes back to save a fish. With people she probably wouldn't be as concerned. She's not a social person.

    As for the drawing her gun, I elaborate on that in a post on my blog about the storyboard process. It's foreshadowing but I'm also trying to setup a character trait that she routinely finds herself in situations like this (where she's just stolen something or is somewhere she's not supposed to be and is about to be caught) and that her first instinct is to pull out the gun. So it's supposed to seem instinctual, really fast, like this is her gut reaction is to pull a gun on someone.

    As for an establishing shot. I decided a different approach. I don't want the audience to necessarily know their bearings right away because when she first wakes up she doesn't know either. I wanted to kind of expand the environment as she moves through the scene we see more of the room and understand more of what's happening. I'm planning to add quite a lot of background detail to the scene to help push the backstory. It's difficult to see in the layout since it's very primitive, but there will be a lot of stuff in the background and around her and just the visual look of things will add a lot to the story.

    The opening shot is also starting directly on the sun. There's no lights obviously in the layout but the idea of that first shot is that we're following the sunlight to where she's sleeping. And the sunlight will be very subtly moving across the room during the scene to enhance the sense the urgency that she needs to escape. And when the bottle crashes and people start waking up, the room comes to life, I might cheat a little and brighten it up just to add to that effect.

    It's difficult to pre-visualize lighting when it plays a story role like that. I'm also planning to add a general haze over the whole room with smoke sim or something to that effect to add a bit of mystery and depth. And that also might magically clear up when the room comes to life too.

    I have to work on it a bit but here is a rough lighting test to give some sense of the atmosphere of the finished scene I'm aiming for. I'll probably want to add some more light on her specifically, but this is the general mood, maybe even a bit darker. I added the second porthole window because it didn't seem bright enough at first but I don't know if I'll keep it in. What do you think? There are also dimmer sort of night-light floor lights low on the walls by the floor. I think those will help give light to some of the lower shots where we cut to her feet or things on the ground.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Anyway, this is rough and not the best angle. I think my priority next is going to be to work on the environment and the lighting. So I'll be able to share a better sense of the mood of the scene soon.

    Thank you very much for that feedback. It was incredibly helpful to get me thinking about all these things again. I hope you'll share more ideas. I'd love to hear them.



  4. #4
    Member 244jovan's Avatar
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    you should post this in "Work in progress",not here



  5. #5
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    OK, she is a twitchy impulsive apprentice thief. Good.
    I don't want the audience to necessarily know their bearings right away because when she first wakes up she doesn't know either.
    Do NOT mess with your audience that way. Even Elephants Dream, with the ultimate "I have no idea what's going on here" character, Emo, had an establishing shot of Emo and Proog between large mechanical walls before they went exploring inside the Machine.

    I can imagine her trying to sneak out before the others wake up, but I don't understand why this is a desperation move on her part.

    The action takes place on a ship. Ships rock. Ok, maybe modern cruise ships don't rock much, with their gyro stabilizers, but you can use the rocking of the ship to help the action.

    She is in bed, there is a large port hole and the sun has just risen. If the ship rocks, the beam of sunlight coming in the port hole moves up and down. Maybe it shines directly in her face, maybe it reflects off the mirror on the wall opposite the port hole, at any rate, the rocking of the ship provides some quick motion for the sunbeam.

    She wakes up. She doesn't move, but looks around to get her bearings, then gets out of bed and recovers her purse. So far she is an early riser amidst a bunch of sleeping drunks (we see all the bottles). Establishing her as a thief: some random takings and putting into her bag: maybe the guy left his wristwatch on the nightstand, she grabs it. Some sleeping girl is wearing a pretty necklace, she carefully removes it and puts it in her bag. Now we know she is a thief. Something startles her, she draws her gun, looks around, relaxes, puts it away. Now we know she is armed and twitchy.

    This is a large cabin on the ship. It has a porthole, so one wall opens to the deck rather than an interior hallway. She carefully heads toward the door onto the deck. The ship is rolling, and she carefully steps over a couple of bodies in her way. Now, she saves the fish.

    Remember, the ship is rolling, there is a fish bowl on the table, too full of water, and the water is sloshing around. As she approaches, a roll of the ship spills some of the water and the fish is carried along with it. Now, we have just seen her step over some humans to get to the door, but she stops to pick up the fish and put him back in the fistbowl. The fish looks at her from the fishbowl. She looks back, gives the fish a little wave and blows it a kiss. Instant karma for Nemu.

    Then she steals the ring. That is something she knows will be missed. Drunks might not remember where they left their wristwatch, or whether they were wearing their necklace at the party last night, but the wedding ring is not something even drunken revelers would misplace. So once she grabs the ring she has an urgent reason to escape.

    Anyway: storytelling 101: the opening scene establishes who where when and maybe what why and how. If you create questions on any of these vital points for the audience, you must quickly answer them or you'll lose your audience. You can establish when with the props: is her gun a flintlock, a glock or a phaser? Is the background noise wooden sailing ship creaks and groans, muffled engine noise or beeps and boops of computerized transportation?

    Mess with your characters all you like, in fact, it's usually encouraged. But don't mess with your audience.
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  6. #6
    Member Consideringthepickle's Avatar
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    Sorry for going dark for the past 2 weeks. I felt it was inexcusable enough to write a pretty long blog post about it: http://nemusidian.wordpress.com/2013...ty-production/

    I changed my mind. I think you'll sympathize with her when you see the situation she's in.
    I took a step back from working on this scene, to look at the rest of the movie which put things more in perspective. I went through the script and cut 3 pages so it's going to be closer to 6 mins. now instead of 9 I think.

    The purpose of this scene is to setup the rest of the movie. So the backstory isn’t important. All that really matters in this first scene is that she’s a thief and has stolen this ring, which turns out to be a wedding ring. Those are the only points that need to be hit.

    And because it's a very short amount of time, I don't want to add in other information that would clutter that original intention. So there's actually a good reason for not explicitly explaining the backstory. So I’m interested in hinting at the backstory through her outfit, the environment, the animation, but I want to leave it ambiguous for the audience to make up their own ideas.

    In the layout I don't think it was clear, and just taking this one scene on it's own you don't quite get what's happening, but at the end of the scene the reveal is that the men who walk in are groomsmen wearing tuxes. And, in the next scene we cut to a ballroom with lots of establishing shots setting up a wedding reception. To help clarify I'm going to share the first full 2 scenes of the script for anyone interested to put things in better context: http://nemusidian.files.wordpress.co...st-2-pages.pdf

    I'm also imposing story lock. I haven't storyboarded or done layout for the rest of the movie yet, but at this point I'm satisfied with the story as a whole so I'm not going to make any big changes. My focus is on the technical side and on the details of the animation. The script is pretty solid, the only area that's left a little ambiguous is the beginning of Scene 2 I just wrote basically to do a series of establishing shots but haven't figured out what those might be yet, so I'm trying to think of ideas for that that.

    My plan is to bring the first scene through to completion within the next week or so, granted that I still don't know how long animation or rendering will take. But this is meant to be a quick and dirty production. I'm not planning to spend too long on it as I indicated in my blog post.

    I started doing lighting tests for the first scene, but I've run into a significant problem with noise in Cycles. Here's a test at 1000 samples (Note: Weighting issues and none of the modeling is finished):

    There's still quite a bit of noise. I've done a lot of research on lighting and Cycles this past week. Ironically the lighting scheme I'm aiming for here is the one Cycles is poorest at, an interior, natural lit scene, so I'm probably going to have to fake it to some degree. If anyone has any tips for that that'd be helpful, but the biggest issue is just getting the noise down. This image isn't even with the finished models yet, except for Nemu it's all very simple geometry and there's still noticeable noise at 1000 samples. This is a big problem.

    I'm considering other render engines like Yafray or Luxrender but they aren't as integrated with Blenders render passes. I might switch to Blender Internal and just fake a lot of things. I'd rather do that than spend a lot of time and energy having to deal with noise reduction. So if I can't find a solution that works to reduce the noise level significantly without degrading the quality of the image I might have to abandon Cycles. Tips on this would be greatly appreciated. I'm really very frustrated.


    @Orinoco: What you're saying is we need to establish the setting so the audience knows where this is taking place. I'm convinced that it'll be more effective to establish things gradually as the scene progresses. I think it's much more important to establish that situation of not knowing quite where we are or what has happened, then the physical setting. I think it's pretty obvious where we are anyway, because of the title, and we open to a porthole window. It gives us, as an audience, a chance to explore the environment as she's doing in the scene and discovers the ring. We're not trying to hide that it's a stateroom on a cruise ship, but specifically the scene in it with the bodies lying around and the party aftermath atmosphere. That's the thing that needs to be revealed gradually to tell the story. So there's an air of mystery almost, but as the scene progresses and we get to the end, the haze, literally and figuratively, is lifted and when the groomsmen walk in through the door we understand completely the situation at that point.

    I don't want to change anything that would involve disrupting the flow and staging at this point because I'm pretty happy with most of the scene. I know this is the layout phase and changes are easy at this point, but really big changes, like you have to think about if she changes her walking path for example that has compounding effects to the rest of the scene, so changes that seem easy can have a chain effect on the entire scene. I think the scene works in this layout. I'm going to start blocking and refining things now, but I think we can get there within the confines of what's there already. I'm just trying to narrow down the details of the animation at this point.

    In case things don't read, I have a backup plan. We can cut to text: "The stow away has overslept her welcome."
    So we can fallback on that if needed. It's also pretty easy to add a couple shots on to the beginning of the scene, one of the cruise ship and one of the stateroom as establishing shots if it turns out the scene doesn't work as I intended it. So those options are there as failsafes, but I prefer not to use them unless there seems to be a real need for them.

    I'm not sure about rocking the ship. I hadn't actually thought of that because cruise ships do tend to be pretty stable. I'm going to think on that one though. It's an interesting idea.

    I appreciate your enthusiasm and all your ideas. Thank you.
    Last edited by Consideringthepickle; 15-Oct-13 at 20:09.



  7. #7
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    Yeah, with gyro stabilizers, cruise ships don't rock much. But you can do a lot with rocking the boat, so call it artistic licence.

    If there is an ocean view outside that porthole in the first shot, I think we establish we are near the ocean, probably on a ship. But the porthole shaped window might just be some modern architect's conceit for a nice seaside mansion. If the scene outside the porthole moves up and down while we watch (and we hear wave and engine noise), we establish we are moving on the ocean, in other words, we are definitely on a ship.

    I am not as sanguine as you about your audience sympathising with Nemu because they understand her situation. They may have been the victim of someone in a similar situation, and hate her. She is, after all, a thief. She has to do something, and fairly early on, to establish herself as a 'sympathetic' character, so we care what happens to her.

    Back to Elephants Dream, I made a rough shot list of the beginning, not counting the titles:

    00:00 to 00:06 reflection of Proog's face (introduce Proog)
    00:06 to 00:08 Proog's face
    00:08 to 00:10 action close up flying cables (teaser and set up for Save the Cat)
    00:10 to 00:13 Proog knocks Emo down
    (introduce Emo and “Save the Cat” scene – Proog saves Emo from cables)
    00:13 to 00:18 action close up flying cables (reinforces Save the Cat)
    00:18 to 00:31 Emo and Proog on bridge outside the Machine (establishes location)
    00:31 to 00:45 Emo and Proog talk: Proog “Emo, it's not safe here, let's go” (establishes motivation)

    In the first 45 seconds, we meet the characters, set up the location, and state the thesis for the rest of the movie: Find somewhere safe.

    That "Save the Cat" is terminology from Robert Blake's screenplay book of the same name, and refers to the action the hero does to set him or herself up as the hero. In Elephants Dream, it isn't a 'sympathetic' action as is normally understood: Proog pushes Emo to the ground, rather roughly. But by sandwiching that action between the flying cable close ups, the audience understands that Proog did, indeed, help Emo out. Maybe saved his life. So when Proog invites Emo to follow, the audience follows as well.

    Nemu needs to do something like that. I don't know what that something would be. Maybe it will just show up in the expression on her face. But it should be something she does, not her predicament or how others are mean to her, or anything external to her. Maybe we will just see her wink at her persuers as she ducks out the porthole... But you need to get your audience on her side.

    On other matters: that's not only a lot of noise, that's a horrendously long render time, and it will only get worse as you add materials and more complex geometry and hair. I've only just started using cycles, so I can't offer much advice there, but you do need to work on that render time.
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  8. #8
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    I did some testing today with Blender Internal. I think the results speak for themselves. There's some noise but dramatically better than Cycles and in 3mins. for full res to boot. All the objects have a basic grey .8 material here.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #9
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    @Orinoco: I think what you're getting at will come across in the nuance of the animation. That's going to be my focus soon.



  10. #10
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    Three minutes is way better than fourteen. I wonder if it is possible to combine Cycles and Blender Internal in the compositor. I'm thinking Cycles for sets and props that don't move, and Blender Internal for the character. Or maybe the other way around if it is light bouncing around the room that is giving that huge cycles render time.
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  11. #11
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    Most of the noise is because of the particular situation. It's the fact that it's an interior being lit by only natural light. Essentially the room is a box with a hole in it and shining light through it to illuminate the scene. I included other lamps of course to mitigate this. In both Cycles and BI scenes I used area lamps on the ceiling and there's lamps in both portholes in Cycles instead of trying to use world background, but I couldn't find a way around also having the sun outside the room in order to create the right shadows.

    Cycles works the opposite way real photons work. They start at the camera and hit a pixel with a material that tells them the likelihood it'll be effected by light. At that point random rays are shot out from that point and if they hit a light it'll be lighter and if they don't it'll be darker. Because it's random with each pass this creates inaccurate noisy results, so it has to render many many many passes and then average the value. Unfortunately if the light is very hard to find, like the sun in this scene, it requires many many many more passes. And that number increases exponentially because once you've done 1000 passes and still have noise you need a lot more than just another 1000 to average out that noise, so it goes up to like 10,000 and so on... to the point of infinity presumably so some lighting situations simply impractical to resolve under that algorithm.

    I think that's how it works anyway. I'd check with a developer or someone who knows more about it, but that's my understanding of it. So the real problem with Cycles is the randomization part. I think there's work being done to make it smarter so instead of randomly sending out rays, the algorithm can be told where the lights are and send them in that direction, and I think, if that's the case something like that would dramatically reduce the number of samples needed to render a clear scene. But again, I'm not a developer. I only know from what I've read and interpreted myself. If I'm wrong about any of it I'd love to be corrected.

    So yeah it's the light itself. I tested each light separately in Cycles on it's own. The majority of the noise is coming from the sun lamp and a blue spot lamp to the right that I'm using as a rim light (although at this angle it's sort of doubling as a fill light). Both of which I couldn't get good results replacing them with mesh emitters because they need to be directional.

    Edit: Some of my Cycles light breakdowns. You can see the difference in the noise.
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    Rim Light (Spot Lamp) Only
    Last edited by Consideringthepickle; 16-Oct-13 at 22:25.



  12. #12
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    I did a test in Cycles, animating the seed value to see if the noise would emulate film grain. There's more grain here than would be in the final obviously in order to render faster and emphasize the effect. I was also playing around with animating overexposure effect in post.


    An important thing to remember, if I were to go this route, it's impossible to change the noise in post, so I'd have no control over the effect in post.

    EDIT: I think Youtube might be compressing it. Try playing it at 1080p. Meanwhile I'll look into it.
    Last edited by Consideringthepickle; 18-Oct-13 at 12:02.



  13. #13
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    It actually looks better compressed than at 1080HD. It doesn't really look like grainy film, because the noise is distibuted unevenly over the image. For example, when she sits up, around frame 566, there is a lot of grain on her right sleeve, and on the edge of the lefthand pillow, that is not present elsewhere in the image. In the HD version, there is a lot of variation in noise from frame to frame.
    I think, if you are going for a grainy film effect, you'd be better off doing post pro using a randomly specked noise mask that hacks saturation.
    Finished Projects: Absinthe on the Rocks
    Focused Critique: Anime Girl
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  14. #14
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    The HD version didn't upload properly. It looks considerably different than what I have on my computer. Here's a snapshot and also the encoding I used:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Film Grain Test Settings.png 
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ID:	265464
    The noise is a lot more uniform. The Youtube compression heavily splotched and compressed everything. I'm having trouble figuring out the right settings for uploading to Youtube at 1080p to avoid the compression. I started a thread on stack exchange if anyone has any answers: http://blender.stackexchange.com/que...ion-for-yotube



  15. #15
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    You're right, that is a lot different than what I saw on YouTube. I use Vimeo. Their processing seems to be a lot better than YouTubes'.
    Finished Projects: Absinthe on the Rocks
    Focused Critique: Anime Girl
    Animation: Cartoon Girl Shelly



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