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Thread: ArchViz C&C highly appreciated

  1. #1
    Member KarelZe's Avatar
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    ArchViz C&C highly appreciated

    Hi there,

    this is my first own blenderartists thread.

    i am aimed to create a photorealistic indoor scene, which I can use for furniture rendering.

    My goal is to create a flat in the style of art nouveau combined with state-of-art-elements.

    Everything is entirely done in Blender. No Postproduction at this early stage. Of course the scene is still missing some furniture and some parts are waiting for a proper shader.

    I highly appreciate every single comment on improving the lighting, shading etc.

    Thank you.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    PS: Sorry if this was a posted twice, but an error occured during saving.



  2. #2
    Welcome to the forum. The project seems to be coming along very nicely. Obviously it will need additional samples to clear out some of the noise. One area I would suggest a second look would be the wood floor, specifically the width of the planks, they look to be scaled too large in my opinion. A nit picky thing would be you might want to adjust the Y rotation of your camera slightly.

    I'll look forward to watching your progress.
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  3. #3
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    yeah bump up the samples, have another look at floring scale and detail, all in all a nice start!

    if i remember correctly, andrew price does an awesome tutorial on realistic texturing?
    how to use color maps in the node editor!

    i definitely reccommend you check it out

    heres the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W07H7xeUnGE#t=392
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  4. #4
    I think that the radiator is way too big. Also if it is Art nouveau style perhaps the radiator should be hidden. It was not very common to have it exposed like on your render...
    I would also choose different floor - maybe some parquettes...
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  5. #5
    Member KarelZe's Avatar
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    Thank you harleynut, BAGraphics and maraCZ for your fast replies. :-) I will take every single tip to account and use it to optimize the renders. As a next step I try to improve the floor and optimizing the quality of the renders, while keeping the rendertimes acceptable. Thank you also for the advice about the radiator. I am either going to remove it or hide it behind some wooden cover panel.

    I expect to post an updated version soon.

    Thank you.



  6. #6
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    Originally Posted by maraCZ View Post
    I think that the radiator is way too big. Also if it is Art nouveau style perhaps the radiator should be hidden. It was not very common to have it exposed like on your render...
    I would also choose different floor - maybe some parquettes...
    Fully agree with maraCZ. rescale the radiator size. It looks too big.

    Add some glossiness to the floor and some subtle bump.

    I always recommend this tutorial for realistic texturing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W07H7xeUnGE



  7. #7
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    I feel like the doorways are way too rectangular for nouveau style... lots of google images show craaazzzzyyy door frames and what not -- https://www.google.com.au/search?rlz...interior&btnG=

    I highly suggest getting some reference and modelling specific elements from those images... will help significantly.



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