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  1. #1
    New User
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    Jun 2017
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    Two HDR's. One for light, one for camera.

    Hi.

    So I'm making and indoor scene.
    I like the lights coming from one HDR, but I didn't like the way it looked.

    Do I made this simple setup:
    http://i.imgur.com/r36nB75.png

    It looks fine. The camera sees one HDR, but the light comes from another.

    The problem is, everything goes wrong when it comes to windows.
    I use this nodes for window glass (so it renders faster):
    http://i.imgur.com/TMyl0ze.png


    The camera sees good HDR in background, but in windows glass it sees the wrong one. And it seemes like it is reflected, not just behind it?
    It looks like this:
    http://i.imgur.com/AZAgRUg.png

    My knowledge of nodes and light paths is not enough on this one.
    So how do I do this?
    I tried connecting other Light Paths and I managed to get the other HDR to appear in window glass, but it is not behind them, like background, but more like reflected, like in a mirror and not a see through glass.
    How do I do this, without changing glass node?



  2. #2
    Member Speedthriller's Avatar
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    Do you actually need the glass in your windows? I mean, you usually wont see it anyway in an interior shot. I personally would leave out the glass panes.



  3. #3
    Member rontarrant's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by iai View Post
    The camera sees good HDR in background, but in windows glass it sees the wrong one. And it seemes like it is reflected, not just behind it?
    It looks like this:
    http://i.imgur.com/AZAgRUg.png
    This comment won't be helpful at all... (just saying)

    Ahem...

    Tell your client it's magic glass, a window into another world.
    -Ron T.

    Asus P8P67-M; Intel i7 2600k; GTX-780; GTX-560 Ti; 16gb Patriot G2; 3 x Caviar Black; Win 7 x64



  4. #4
    Member
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    Sep 2012
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    Shop it in photo



  5. #5
    Wow! What's up with the useless comments on this one?.. Three in a row...

    It's a good idea to use only transparent shader mixed with glossy by Fresnel to speed up the renders, and to set the glass object not to have shadows if all the light in your scene is going to come from the windows. Transparent shader would solve your problem. If you needed to use glass, you could add Is Transmission Ray to your mixing Fac:



  6. #6
    Be careful using fresnel to mix transparent with glossy, as IOR needs to be inverted for backfacing face. If using glass (or fresnel mixing refraction with glossy), the window needs to have a thickness, otherwise it's considered to be infinitely thick and cause bad refraction bending.



  7. #7
    Originally Posted by CarlG View Post
    Be careful using fresnel to mix transparent with glossy, as IOR needs to be inverted for backfacing face. If using glass (or fresnel mixing refraction with glossy), the window needs to have a thickness, otherwise it's considered to be infinitely thick and cause bad refraction bending.
    I assumed one would just use simple planes for windows only for reflection with transparent shader, not refraction. I really think refraction of windows can be ignored in most cases. One would need to have a close up of a corner of a window or something like that for it to start to matter...



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