3D printer...Awesome, isnt it.

i fount this in the internet.
looks like a really powerful thing.
i wonder if blender could someday used to print objects with this printer

anyway…what do u think.?

http://www.aegmaha.com/?id=10385

3d printers arnt new, thave existed for ages

not like this one…

http://www.zcorp.com/images/splash/450_header.jpg

Affordable? At $39900, I might need a bit of extra cash. A rather large bit.

wow i didn´t know that something like this existed only something like a moulding cutter.

does it use ink ???
XD

if the printer itself is 40k i cant imagine how much the materials are going to cost to reload it… and how often they need to be changed…

but on the other hand if its a successful conceiting firm or architectural design company this might be a very good investment as it also probably comes with several years of warranty… (u don’t buy these things for a just a year…)

yea, ive seen these aloong time ago. I think they use wax…

It says that it uses some kind of a fine powder

woah ive never seen a printer like this before!:eek: i would love to have one of these for myself.:yes: maybe the price will decrease by the time i am working.:smiley:

(steals one)

Way cool :D…
I wonder what the limit is to the size of the models that you can make :confused:?

Try Fab @ Home:

These are nearly affordable

The z-Corp. Printers (and some others, too) use fine, white Powder. To get the model coloured, the glue to stick each layer has different colors. Imagine a InkJet-Printer which uses glue instead of ink.
Btw. you wondered what STL stands for in blender’s export menu?
=> Stereolithography - the file format especially designed for 3D-Printers :wink:

So, just copy your exported stl directly to that printer and - voilà

I have seen an inkjet version of a 3D printer. It uses a regular color inkjet printhead that prints with binders in the ink. The printhead passes over layer after layer of starch power or calcium carbonate (chalk) powder. The binder in the ink holds the powder together and when the printing is done, you reach into the powder and take out your artwork and shake off the excess powder. The 3D printer is able to print colored parts because the inkjet printhead has cyan, yellow, and magenta ink mixed with binder. The finished part is not that strong but can be sanded and the surface is a little rough. I think there is a place on the internet where you can send your model and for $50 / 10 inches or something like that they will print out your model in 3D and mail it to you. I can’t remember the name of the website.

its amazing…

here is another good video of 3D printing
there are a lot more in youtube.


and there are some galleries and price lists in
www.thinglab.com

Hessiess is correct. I saw that printer on a television show about 2 years ago. Very cool… yes, but really not that new.

ericsh6

when you are done printing you model on the zcorp printer, you can put it into an oven to cook (warm up at 70 to 80 degrees) and than soak it with good epoxy glue.

this will produce very hard models !!! hard to break !!!

my students are right now finishing up their models. after being soaked in glue, you can sand it, and apply color via airbrush to make fully functional good looking models.

my students are right now finishing up their models. after being soaked in glue, you can sand it, and apply color via airbrush to make fully functional good looking models.

Is there a website where we can see pictures of the artwork your students have printed out? Is the epoxy glue something special that Zcorp sells or is it something you buy at a hardware store? Two part epoxy?