Abandoned

(Mason Blender) #1

This is my newest piece “Abandoned”
it’s is meant to show what it’s like when we abandoned projects, they just get rusty and old.
i 3D scanned the stumps and rocks in myself. the grass is from The Grass Essentials
also testing out the new Pro Lighting: Skies from Blender Guru

hope you like it.

Render:


AO:


Thanks for the time. good luck have fun bye bye.

(shawn.kearney) #2

Fantastic model! Really clean. I’m not too crazy about the lighting and it feels overexposed. I also think your surfaces could use a little refinement, the bark reads closer to concrete to me, and the axehead could use more varied detail.

But overall, really nice work - and I feel kind of funny giving a critique since this isn’t anything I could produce at my current skill level.

(HolyCG) #3

Is the piece of log,that’s only “Abandoned”?

(Mason Blender) #4

I don’t understand the question.

(Mason Blender) #5

Thank you :slight_smile: the bark is actually a 3D scan of a pine tree (white bark) and so it does come off a little concrete like in person too.

(HolyCG) #6

I thought maybe all the things in your scene needed to be rusty and old,since you mentioned that they were “Abandoned.”

(Madrid82) #7

Beautiful composition.

(Lusterflask) #8

I’m not too sure what the sizes of all these objects are supposed to be exactly… somehow it is hard to tell by the result. The texture of mostly everything is pretty, save for the axe head. I suppose it is implied that the axe was abandoned, leaving it to rust, but nothing really rusts with such even distribution. https://mdedm.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/wire-wheel.jpg I think plugging a gradient texture into the factor of a mix between the metal and the metal rust would have made some sense. I think what makes it hard to tell the sizes of the objects is the extremeness of the focal blur. The flowers next to the log are far too blurred, unless that log is supposed to be two inches or something, which wouldn’t make a whole lot of sense. :stuck_out_tongue: The composition is very pretty though, so I’ll be glad to see your next entry.

(Owldude) #9

Really nice! However, I think the depth of field is over the top, as is the texturing.

(TARDIS Maker) #10

First of all, nice work! The composition is really good, and the lighting is also really good. I’m also wondering, did you set this up to the golden rule? I haven’t placed it on top or anything, but it seems like it follows those guides fairly well.

Now, the biggest thing that sticks out to me, is the lack of Fresnel. You’ve managed to hide it fairly well with the lighting, but it still shows. I’m sure that if you add it, it will help bring a little extra life into this.

The rust on the blade looks very off, as does the lantern. It might need hand painting, specifically on the lantern, for it to work well. The handle on the ax also looks off.

The last thing, there isn’t enough interaction between the ax and the log. I’m guessing you just had it intersecting, but it would help a lot if the wood was chipping somewhat.

Another touch, could be to add some rust that dripped down on the logs.

I hope this was somewhat helpful.

(TARDIS Maker) #11

That’s good! This is one of the really good ways of learning. You start to see mistakes in other peoples work, then you learn to avoid them in your own.

(Hadriscus) #12

I think it’s the task of chopping down the stump that has been abandoned.

Nice picture !

(HolyCG) #13

Yeah,Probably.

(OMGCG) #14

Those rocks look like they were put on purpose there, Doesn’t look a bit natural.
The daisy in the middle is getting in the view, I think, it should look better on the left side of the picture.
The axe might have fell down, assuming its stuck there since an year.

Overall nice and beautiful scene.
The bark looks amazing too.

(copperplate) #15

This is really excellent work! The image has a warm, creamy tone to it, with suppressed highlights; almost like a vintage photograph or a log image from a cinema camera that has been lightly graded. I don’t think the DOF looks off. Any composition should be theoretically possible with the right combination of focal length, aperture, and (not needed in Blender) neutral density filters. Good job!

BTW, how did you do the 3D scanning? Was there a particular device you used?

(HelloHiHola) #16

It’s an image that says a lot and people have a lot to say about! I think the textures are great - most of what we can accomplish is in the textures and fantastically chunky and worn here. The over exposed nature of the image fits, to me, the quality of a film still. Blown out highlights happen more often in casual photography.

I understand the scale to be coming and going - the lamp appears to be not much taller than a dandelion in this image and the ax is a hatchet for chopping down small trees instead of being a long-handled ax. So, on close examination, the scale gets trippy.

But your control of what you learned and what you have is on good display here. It’s hard to keep all these different aspects running smoothly, modeling, texturing, lighting and the plug-ins or essential grass bits not to mention the scanned textures! So it’s really nice to see you chopping away at the challenges! :wink:

(reynante) #17

Amazing stuff as always, Mason. Lovely lighting and composition. :slight_smile:

(DEVKUMAR) #18

fantastic!

(Joey Blendhead) #19

Okay… I was getting ready to critique this really heavily when I saw it in the top row… But then I saw it was you… The ax and log being split are very low quality… The white pine’s bark is just too big… Doesn’t look right, and though it is real geometry, it looks like a bump map. Give the shader some work… The ax handle looks like whoever used it quit because he got so many splinters… Just WAY too much Bump…
Also, it appears you never used an ax before… Too much rust.

(Potatowarrior13) #20

I assume you used the IvyGen addon, for the ivy, but how did you get the leaves to be shaped the way that they are and also get them to droop realistically?