Any effective ways to inprove modelling skill?

Title asks it all, are there any effective ways to improve your modelling skill besides the usual practice, practice, practice?

Do you really expect an answer :wink: ?

Stefano

Use Blender for a start. It teaches a better modelling workflow than any other 3D software I’ve seen. Especially with its heavy use of poly/subd over NURBs. Try to avoid using NURBs - even for curves, I recommend beziers.

One thing that is very handy to get the hang of is to model using quads instead of triangles. Try to make every face of every model a quad - this increases your skills in judging animation flow-lines. It also makes your models move in a smoother and more realistic way and makes it easier to do UV projection.

Follow through the manual from blender.org and you will get some good ideas as to how you can use all of Blender’s features.

As you say, practise is the best thing you can do. However, don’t spend ages making silly, useless models. Try to work on challenging projects. It’s only when you realise that you don’t know how to do something that you start learning. That’s where Elysiun is really useful when you get stuck.

Take a closer look at the world around for references… if you can take pictures, better. And use them in your 3D view for precision.

yeah, good tutorials. also the ones written for other software will help. have a look at CGtalk.com - it’s kinda frustrating to see what ppl make there, but it’s also extremely challenging. again, don’t get distracted by the fact that this and that was done using maya, XSI or others - at least for modelling, blender can take that challange any time. (except with nurbs, i admit it)

good luck

Use Blender for a start. It teaches a better modelling workflow than any other 3D software I’ve seen. Especially with its heavy use of poly/subd over NURBs. Try to avoid using NURBs - even for curves, I recommend beziers.

One thing that is very handy to get the hang of is to model using quads instead of triangles. Try to make every face of every model a quad - this increases your skills in judging animation flow-lines. It also makes your models move in a smoother and more realistic way and makes it easier to do UV projection.

Follow through the manual from blender.org and you will get some good ideas as to how you can use all of Blender’s features.

As you say, practise is the best thing you can do. However, don’t spend ages making silly, useless models. Try to work on challenging projects. It’s only when you realise that you don’t know how to do something that you start learning. That’s where Elysiun is really useful when you get stuck.[/quote]

There’s the kind of answer I was looking for. Thanks for the all the advice.

Okay. You asked a question that you may not like the answer to. I have never met a good 3d artist (and by good I mean a professional that makes a living doing it) that does not know how to draw. Simple as that. Learn to draw. The same principles apply . If you want to get an even better perspective…play with some clay.
:smiley:

I can draw what I see pretty well except people partly because of the shadows I’m thinking…gotta work on that :-? .

–Dmitriy

when I first began to model, I would have no eye for detail. Once I started noticeing and adding these details in (instead of “this amorphous blob represents a car, and that pile of cones and cylinders is supposed to be a tree, this oval is a rock, now lets add a gingerbread man,” take time out to notice things. I just recently noticed that collarbones go upwards as they go out, for example! (OK, everyone is laughing at me now.) I remember realizing my hexagonal pencil was wrong because the intersection I had on the sharpened edge was flat, not the curved one in reality. Of course, if you can draw well, you should be able to notice these details anyways probably :wink: