art student needs help!

I’m trying to create a giant sphere that someone could step into and walk inside of-- the inside of the sphere would be covered in images, and as the person walks, the sphere would roll revealing different portions of the interior texture. I’m new to blender, but need to do this project quickly–can anyone point me in the right direction?

don’t really understand your descriptiong but if you go here we can enroll you in our Blender Academy and the folks there may be able to help you out! :wink:

Unfortunately, in a hort time frame this is not feasible. To give a convincing effect, you must spend a lot of time practicing (especially considering Blender’s harsh learning curve). If you want to start learning, though, the tutorials at www.blender3d.com should be of very good assistance. Good luck!

Is this a way of asking someone to do your project for you ? :wink:

md01

Create a UV sphere of the size you want, select all the vertices and extrude to make it slightly larger. You will need to select the inner sphere and flip the normals to have the viewed surface on the inside.

You can texture the outside with whatever you want. On the inside, select the vertices in a pattern you want and add an image texture to different areas. When you move the camera inside the sphere, you will see the images on the ‘wall’ of the sphere. It is easy to use keyframe animation to move the camera from outside to inside the sphere. You can move the camera or rotate the sphere to view different images on the inside. It would output an .AVI file to view, it wouldn’t be interactive. It would also be easy to add .avi movie files as textures or use still images and change them every few frames.

If you use UV mapping to add the images, you should be able to move the camera and see the images within the game engine (never worked with that, someone else can give more details).

thanks guys…we have it all covered! it’s going to be like blenderanim said and it’ll be a UV sphere only interactive and images will be floating at vertice points and if any of you have seen the movie Simon…it’ll be like that! :wink: