Barn Find - Bell 214

Having modeled aircraft, locomotives, ships, and cars, I decided to go ahead on my journey modeling conventional transportation systems by aiming to capture another wonder of aviation, the rotorcraft. In this case, I decided to recreate the Bell 214 helicopter, focusing on ensuring that components like the rotor system and blades were modeled accurately. However, when it came time to render a scene with this model, I wanted to do it in a way that showed off the scale of these complex machines next to regular everyday objects. To flesh out the scene, prop models from polyhaven.com as well as blenderkit textures were used and modified to make it suitable for the dusty and neglected look I was going for in this hangar scene. You can find more of my hard surface model renders at my artstation page ( ArtStation - Aravind Madhavan)







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Absolutely brilliant!

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Thank you @Sorn !

I think the floor could use a tad more resolution. The hose could use some dirt, or bevel even… as it stands now it catches attention because of the less detailed shape (in contrast with the impressive rest of the shot). And I’m unsure about the purpose of the bird, although I assume it’s an allegory.

I only say this because you forced me to, it’s an astonishing shot! :slight_smile:

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Thanks for the detailed criticism. Regarding the floor, I thought I could get away with a lower texture resolution due to the low angle of the shot, but I guess this wasn’t the case! As for the hose, it was a last-minute addition and I agree that it could do with better integration into the overall scene (dirt, dust, etc.). As for the bird, I was going for a nature allegory to aviation and its development. Finally, this is not so much an excuse as a fact. I originally wanted to render the scene with mostly 4k textures but this proved too much for my machine, so I had to be satisfied with 2k textures across the entire scene. I guess a more thorough optimization of individual assets might have been a better approach.

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The hose works wonderfully to my eye, but yes, it could improve the overall shot a lot with a teensy-weensy extra polish. It does help the composition significantly, so I wouldn’t remove the hose at all.

The floor texture resolution would improve the shot marginally, so no biggie. I put it there in case you were looking for any critique for a last round of touch-up of your scene.

The bird could be better integrated, but I understand its function and it serves it well. It also nudges the viewer to look for more details on the shot, once found. So it’s a good thing it’s there (besides the allegory, I mean).

Anyway, brilliant shot!

Besides the obvious gorgeous hero model, I love the atmosphere, dust particles, lighting… great work!

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Love it, great job with the dust, how did you get that effect?

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Thanks @ JWC I have always wanted to achieve this sort of dust effect. In this case, I used particle simulation with the material for the source particle being a translucent shader. Specifically, I made use of this tutorial by [Approximated | Digital Artist] titled ’ Make The Air Dusty | Blender Tutorial’ ( Make The Air Dusty | Blender Tutorial (youtube.com)).

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Looove the rest of the renders with the helicopter out of the scene. Fantastic job!

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I featured you on BlenderNation, have a great weekend!

You’re on the featured row! :+1:

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Looks great! I recently completed my first car and got into texturing it but the process was quite overwhelming, especially because I have no clue what the best approach is. I used UDIMs and grouped things using materials and then brought it into Substance Painter. Would you mind giving me an insight how you texture your assets?

Hi @terloveq, I have been wanting to use UDIMs myself but just never got around to using it. My usual workflow is to assign materials in blender to geometry sets based on the kind of texel density I want for a particular part of the model. For separating individual pieces of the geometry within each material set, I make use of vertex coloring. With the appropriate settings, substance painter can recognise these vertex colors to produce ID maps. Once you have these ID maps, color selection masks can be used to add the kind of textures you want to specific parts of the mesh within a single material or UV map. The approach you mention using UDIMs and individual materials is something I have tried and been unable to do due to limitations of my machine. This is why a case by case approach for different parts of my model with texel density requirements in mind seems to work better for me

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Thanks for sharing, seems more structured than my approach and probably easier to work with! I checked you Artstation and like your projects, looking forward to whats coming next :slight_smile:

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