Beginner into 3D art

Hello

I’m pretty new to 3D art… to art in general. Not really talented in drawing or painting. I’m trying to learn from Youtube tutorials. Could you recommend me some up to date tutorials to blender? And do you have to be good in everything as an 3D artist, like modeling, sculpting, texturing, rigging, animating …? If not, how do you guys find work for those individual steps? I’ve seen some people texture paint objects. Is that necessary or can you aslo just use textures from the internet?

I’ve never tried sculpting a character yet cause I’mm a bit afraid cause of my drawing skills and lack of creativeness. I really need to look into lighting and camerawork. What I don’t get either are the nodes. I’m a bit overwhelmed.

Right now I’mm trying to model an ice scythe from a picture I found on google. Please tell me what you think.

Thank you guys so much already.

Are you using version 2.79 or 2.80?

I like your scythe very much. :slight_smile:

There are great video training courses everywhere. As you know, they’re free on YouTube.

My personal favorites are at a site called Udemy. Wait until the courses are on sale for $10 or $11 each, which they might be today on July 22. Never pay more than that for a Udemy course because they go on sale many times a month.

One of my favorite instructors is Alex Cordebard.

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Thank you very much^^

Are those courses for using blender in general or to create an individual object?

I use 2.80 beta

You might want to start watching this tutorial playlist. I haven’t watched it yet, but seeing as it’s from the official Blender youtube channel, it might be worth checking out.

Keep in mind I haven’t gotten a chance to play with 2.80 yet. However when I get around to it i’ll be using that playlist as a guide.

Yeah I just started to watch those thank you:)

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Usually not a specific object, but the courses often have a focus - like animation, or low-polygon modeling, or how to design video game environments.

oh ok thanks a lot^^

Also, friend, “be patient!” You’ve stumbled into an enormous world, full of specialties. Don’t judge your own work too quickly, and don’t too quickly seek affirmation. Just start “doing things,” one thing after another after another. You probably will never “completely master” all of what Blender has to offer.

(But you sure can have fun trying!) :smiley:

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I’m also a beginner. I’m still using 2.79b. The tutorial that started me on this path was the Blender Donut Tutorials ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYj6e-72RDs&list=PLBfWeQ9E-fecxiw9A7S5S2sseJ0gEmnVQ) by Blender Guru. However, before I dug into videos, I spent some time reading the user’s manual (https://docs.blender.org/manual/en/latest/index.html) , especially the chapters about the user interface.

Some people observed that the Donut tutorial(s) is for more advanced artists. I, personally, didn’t find it so. My daughter also learned Blender from the donut tutorials, however, she’s a much more artistic person than I am. Then, again, I’m a beginner, and as such, I don’t know much; also, each person’s mileage might vary. :smile:

Once I went past that tutorial, from beginning to the end, I started a more advanced one -
the anvil tutorials (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yi87Dap_WOc), which is supposedly an intermediate set of tutorials. I could finish it, thanks to the lessons learned from the donut tutorial(s).

The third set of tutorials for beginners I used are the low poly(gons?) tutorials by Grant Abbit (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-L57XSX70w&list=PLn3ukorJv4vtkqLZLtxVDgM3BSCukFF7Y). After that, I went crazy with all kind of excellent tutorials from great artists, too many to count here.

Hope this will help you.

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