Blender, Bullet and Forensic Animation

I am curious whether Blender and Bullet are suitable for forensic animation? I know that Blender with an experienced user can create the animations but would the Bullet physics library hold up to expert witness testimony with respect to physical simulations?

Perhaps there are a few legal eagles or forensic experts among our community that can help shed some light on this subject.

regards,

honeycomb

no matter what package you use, you are just illustrating anyways… The footage, or simulation you give can only help to tell the story.

True…burden of proof would be on the presenter no matter what software package you use. Only way around it would be to perform a true physical reinactment. But, you are simply building proof for your argument… illustrating an idea.

actually,If i got the question right, forensic animation means simulating how things really will work if you make them real - like material tests, etc. Then the answer is that Bullet could probably be tweaked to come really close to real results, as by what I’ve seen. I think some company even tried simulating their robot’s behaviour in blender.

I am curious whether Blender and Bullet are suitable for forensic animation? I know that Blender with an experienced user can create the animations but would the Bullet physics library hold up to expert witness testimony with respect to physical simulations?

I’m not sure how physically accurate it is. ODE may be a better bet.

Largely it would come down to how accurate you need it to be, which would depend on the circumstances. You would almost certainly have to prove it modelled the real world correctly by comparing real tests to simulations.

Edit - You may want to try asking on their forums:
http://www.continuousphysics.com/Bullet/phpBB2/index.php

Forensic animation seems to be heading toward using digital scene recording devices (similar to portable mo cap setups) to accurately record the “scene of the crime.” This data is transfered to 3d software which recreates the scene quicker than someone could model it using recorded dimensions and photographs. Of course, as with mo-cap, it would need some cleaning up.

As far as the physical simulation is concerned, that’s the work of the engineering experts, not the software package. The forensic expert recreates the accident or crime on paper, then provides “pose to pose”, sometimes “frame to frame” data to the animator.

If you take a look at companies actually working in forensic animation, the modeleing and animation isn’t anything Blender can’t do. The question as to suitability would revolve more around whether Blender can create scenery based on digital data collected by those scene recorders.