Blender, CG development and History

Hello,
I know some people may think this is a waste of time, but can someone explain me, why all 3d programs look a like, such as Blender, Maya, XSI, Lightwave, etc, whats the base, from where, all are coming from? I mean, is there a sort of convention or something? that developers, programmers use to start coding this programs ? (yes, because they can even export models, in some cases, animations, between them. It would be really hard to create a 3d program from ZERO, and then happen to find a way to export projects to the “same language” other programs understand - So, theres must be something about this theme).

I never used other program, then Blender, but when I see tutorials or even screenshots, or descriptions about functionalities, they all resamble in functions others got. I believe theres a base for all this and I would love to know more about this theme. Its really fascinating, I really believe in Programmers and developers, they’ve got a HUGE talent! But theres must be more, that it could let understand this people work, otherwise I believe this people are hyper intelligent, out of this world.

While you think about giving any information about this, i’m going to have a look at http://design.osu.edu/carlson/history/lessons.html

Sorry about sounding stupid, but I’m really amazed about this achievements in programming, etc,

Thanks for your time!

I think its a natural progression towards the same usability goals as software gets more complex.

Colours are chosen for their neutrality mostly. buttons and functions change as the technology grows, and stay due to history.

It’s like writing a book. You add text every day, and after a few years, you’ve got a novell.

Blame it on the Greeks, specifically Euclid. We started with a concept of Geometry, that evolved into angles and mathematical ways of expressing objects and conceptualizing them, which evolved into drawings for architecture and graphs, which was then instantiated into computer programs, and when computer graphics came along, the CG field was born and all of that conceptual base was codified into the packages we have today.

That’s why learning Blender gives you a base for all other packages, because all packages have to do certain things, like create a face and give you the ability to move it around.

Yes, good observations there PapaSmurf. It’s similar with many things. Why do most modern European languages share similar or identical alphabets, and have similar words? Why are architectural principles and terms laid down centuries ago still applicable today?

Makes me want to brush up on my ancient history actually.

Thanks for sharing your knowledge people!

There are always exceptions to these rules as well. Some of the apps out there make a name for themselves by approaching the same 3D problems in a different way. Z-Brush and Wings (and Nendo before that) are examples of this sort of radical departure from the traditional vert-pushing 3D apps out there. Another new-ish app (i can’t remember the name off the top of my head) is designed for kids, and it uses a drawing device so kids can literally draw a circle on the screen and the program will turn it into a sphere. Then you can carve sections out of that, or create other shapes, all just by drawing them in 2D. It’s really a neat app… if i can ever remember it I’ll throw up a link or something…

But the math behind all of them is pretty much the same. What’s really interesting is that none of them are ACTUALLY pure euclidian math based. These apps all use that as a base, and then make little adjustments and cheats here and there to speed up the process. This process of cheating the math is one of the reasons some apps are better with some types of 3D modelling and others aren’t as speedy, or are crash-prone when doing certain types of modelling, especially when you start dealing with ideas like N-gons and F-gons and such. it’s really ALL triangles, there are no quads in 3D, it’s just easier to model with 4-sided shapes most of the time. The rendering engines get closer to ‘true’ 3D math, but even then there are often little cheats and tricks that will speed up the process.