Blender classes


(azrael) #1

I have been asked by my teacher at school to take some lessons on blender and 3D in general for other people at school.

The problem is that I really don’t know were to start!
Some of my thoughts are;
give them the blender hot keys (http://pages.prodigy.net/rfairhurst/hotkeysofblender.htm)
Work with them through a begginers tut (any suggestions)?

What would you cover if you where taking a class of people that have never seen blender … or any 3D app. What follow up lessons would you do?

Geoffrey :smiley:


(acasto) #2

Well, I figure the main idea of Blender is creative freedom. What I did with a freind that wanted to learn Blender, I just sat down, briefly explained the interface, made a couple quick things to show the basic modeling functions, then let him go.

It’s hard to teach people to use something that requires creativity, but the funny thing is, if you let them go, then just be their as a reference, then things will sort themselves out. When you give people creative freedom that’s exactly what happens, they get creative… 8)


(haunt_house) #3

I think, you should explain the interface first. split window, buttons, etc. very important is the fact, that blender windows doesn´t have to be clicked.

Or in other words: try to realsize, what you need at least, to get started in blender. And try to imagine, what would cause a newbie to be puzzled. Do the things one at a step and always give examples. try to be slow. One always tends to forget, that one´s own knowledge is not at all common.

And if they never had cg, then start with the PC turned OFF. Give them the idea of threedimensional thinking, how edges and faces work.

use a big cube. to do this

If you have a pc for everyone, then let them make a small scene, step by step, with easy lighting and material, so they can get confident. less is more at the start.

I always stick to the rule, that it is most important to foster selfconfidence. Confusion is death.

Plan on paper. Write your concept down and check, if it is propperly sorted.

I´ll do something similar in the next weeks. Sorry that I cannot post my whole concept.

good speed

HH


(azrael) #4

Thanx for your input, some really good thoughts and concepts! They will help heaps.

In line with thinking like a newby … can those of you who are realively new to blender, say what it is that you find hard or confusing?
This will help me, in what I should explain.

thanx again,

Geoffrey :slight_smile:


(IamInnocent) #5

Acasto’s advice is extremely wise. I’d point out that the accent should be on the CG, not Blender. Use the soft to explain the concepts not the opposite.

I’m 5 months old in Blender. The very most confusing thing in Blender that would get the most votes from everyone is the interface ; it would probably even get 99% of the votes of those who gave up on it. Second would be the fact that it behaves a lot differently than what the common sense and world experience thought us. Just a few examples : the lights pass through objects and dont necessarily cast shawdows ; CSG is hell ; there’s no continuity, only discrete facets… so point out to your student that they shouldn’t refer to what they already know if they’re not to remain confused for a long time.


(djphotoduck) #6

I gave a class once here at the University of Washington (Seattle, WA) on blender. Here is a link to a zip file with two MS Word documents.

http://djphotoduck.0catch.com/docs.html

The files are:
Blendtut.doc -gives a general overview of blender including windows, key commands, etc.

Tutorial.doc - goes over a tutorial for making a model of a molecule called a thiol. The tutorial is really meant to be done interactively in a class setting, but I put a picture in the zip file too so you can see what the molecule should look like when finished. Anyhow, you can get the idea of how to structure a tutorial for a class.

Hope that helps, good luck and keep blending. The interface can be intimidating, but do some tutorials and you’ll learn it fast.

See tutorials here:
http://green.dyndns.org/linksMain.htm