Blender on a netbook?

I just wanted to know, how well does blender work on netbooks?
As far as I know, they are not good at graphical performance, but would it be a total disaster, or enough for blender when no extreme polycounts are reached?
What I’d probably do on it is archviz modeling, no rendering.

I couldn’t say for sure (I don’t even have a netbook), but Blender does work (albeit slower) on my laptop than it does on the full-size desktop, at least for basic modeling. Adding materials, textures, or getting high polycounts slows it to a crawl.

hej,

i’ve got a lenovo s205 with an amd fusion e-350 and 4 gigs of ram and blender works like a charm for all my modeling needs. you can’t really do high poly sculpting and for rendering you will probably want a stronger machine, but other than that there are really no problems with using blender. that’s all i can say.

plus: i run a really minimal arch linux install with openbox on it, which makes all applications 10 times snappier compared to windows 7 or a vanilla ubuntu install.

I haven’t done it for a while, but I remember on a 2gb ram netbook Blender 2.49 ran fine, 2.5x ran choppy at best. However, that was nearly 10 versions of Blender 2.5x ago. I added the extra gb of ram to bring it up to 2gb, can’t remember how well 2.49 ran specifically but probably ‘fine’. Was running windows XP.

How Bmesh copes with less ram is probably going to be the thing to really test out as much as anything.

I have PC
pentium 4 3.2 (1 core)
1 giga ram
GF7900
Windows xp 32

And it works okey, however. Rendering takes time. Bake of the water not high resolutions… Sculp on HP it’s quite tricky.

Moved from “General Forums > Blender and CG Discussions” to “Support > Technical Support”

Adding materials, textures, or getting high polycounts slows it to a crawl.

What’s the poly limit till it crawls, and what are you laptops specs?

Hmm… Is it a better idea to buy a small notebook, or a netbook?
I mean, I was thinking on buying a netbook just because of the size and small price, but wouldn’t the downsides (stuff like blender not nearly as fast as it would on a notebook) be to much out of proportion (price/performance)? I mean, it could be so, that if I pay just 10% more and get a notebook instead, so even though i would lose the small size, I would gain twice as much performance?

Yea I would not get a NetBook if your looking to use blender quite extensively. If I was you I would not worry about the size, but focus on getting the most performance for your price with a laptop (most laptops these days are pretty small anyways). I have tried to run blender on a NetBook before and although it did work, you feel very limited very quickly. They are just not built to handle that level of performance.

If you have the time, I would seriously consider building your own desktop. That was my best decision last year. It’s surprisingly easy to do, if you look around you can do it quite cheaply and you can upgrade very easily when you need to. If this is not an option then I would recommend a laptop. If you already have a desktop(which I kind of think you do) then yay.

So… go for the max performance possible.

the problem with blender are the algorithms used or their implementations, basically Blender is a very good 3D suite considering that is totally free and open source, but it consume a lot more resources compared to the others 3D editor.

Anyway i have a netbook with a dualcore @ 1Ghz with a GPU with shared memory and Blender runs just fine as on a more powerful desktop machine, of course with different limits.

Also keep in mind that the memory controller plays a big role with this kind of applications, and this is another crucial difference between several machines.

I had a netbook for a while (an old 10 inch Eee PC), and I would recommend a separate keyboard/mouse, and probably a screen to plug into, but it does run. :slight_smile: Used it for simple things on occasion.

If you have the time, I would seriously consider building your own desktop. That was my best decision last year. It’s surprisingly easy to do, if you look around you can do it quite cheaply and you can upgrade very easily when you need to. If this is not an option then I would recommend a laptop. If you already have a desktop(which I kind of think you do) then yay.

Yes, I already have a desktop.
The laptop is for alternative use… Carrying it around to university (Pretty often), to show my work to teachers, work on it occasionally, use it for realtime VST effects to make live music performance, that kind of stuff.
I guess I will go for a small laptop then.
Any suggestions for a very light weight laptop with decent performance that is not expensive?
As far as i’ve seen, light laptops are damn expensive.
I do not need to much performance on this, like 2GHz, 2Gb ram, could have no sound card (I have an external one). Preferably no OS, or Ubuntu (I can install my own OS, and I don’t want to pay extra for it). So on…