Blender Render -- Realistic Color Glass

Hello, Blender Users!

I was trying to render a dark-brown glass bottle using Blender Render. I had been monkeying with the material properties, lamps and so on and so forth and here is what I got:


The result looks not so realistic. The bottle should be more transparent and more bright at its middle part (where the cavity is) and more dark at its edges:


Also there is a sharp shade instead of soft.

The question is: Is it possible to get more realistic results with Blender Render? If yes than how?

Thanks!
***Blender 2.74
Ubuntu 14.04

Attachments

Bottle.blend (1.61 MB)

Im afraid you cant get any more realistic with blender render, it uses a one pass lighting system with no ray traced light or light bounce. There hasn’t been any updates to Blender Render since years ago, all updates have been towards Cycles Render which is scheduled to completey replace blender render sometime in the future. Is there any reason that you want to use blender render instead of cycles render?

jcrew3002, thank you very much for your reply!

The reason why I wanted to use Blender Render was that the pictures were of better quality. Pictures made with Blender Cycles are usually grainy. But now I see that I have to learn Cycles :slight_smile:

A great deal of what makes glass look like glass is the reflections - which your bottle currently has none of. Here’s a quick and dirty test (Sorry, I’ve gotten a little bit rusty when it comes to Blender Internal. Maybe one of the BI pros can chime in…):


(.blend file)

Another thing to notice is that all of your objects have unapplied scale - and are still gargantuan. That bottle for example is almost 3 meters high…

There hasn’t been any updates to Blender Render since years ago, all updates have been towards Cycles Render which is scheduled to completey replace blender render sometime in the future.
The last part is a pretty bold statement IMHO. There are still many areas (NPR comes to mind) in which BI is the preferable render solution and Cycles will most likely never be a match. From my understanding there is no intention to completely retire BI anytime soon.

IkariShinji, thank you so much!

Your render looks amazing.

Another thing to notice is that all of your objects have unapplied scale - and are still gargantuan. That bottle for example is almost 3 meters high…

For me dimensions don’t matter. The main thing is proportions. Or dimensions can influence the result of rendering?

IkariShinji, one more question: You added two textures (clouds and noise) to the bottle. When I switch them off the result looks different on the edges. Could you explain me why it happens so? Can we achieve such a result without using textures?

In my opinion it’s always preferable to work in real world scale when it comes to rendering. Light intensities and falloffs, absorption, refraction: They all more or less depend on the rendered objects’ size.

Those textures in my file just create subtle color variations and surface irregularities on the glass - just like you would see on a “real” glass bottle. Is there a specific reason why you’re so strictly against using textures?! You seem to strive for realism: Untextured objects tend to look plain. And “plain” and “realistic” often doesn’t go well together…

IkariShinji, thank you for your reply!

Let me explain what I meant: I’m not against using textures. I’m just trying to get an understanding of the way all those options work. And what I cannot understand is why the rendered bottle with the textures enabled differs from the same rendered bottle with those textures disabled. Why they differ this way? I thought that textures should only distort transitions of colors. But as I can see they also change transparency of the bottle at the edges.


As far as I understand Blender Render combines colors from Material tab with colors from Texture tab. But I cannot figure out the way the colors are being combined. Could you explain me, please?

Textures can do much more than just “change colors”. Have a look at the texture tab and scroll down until you get to the “Influence” section:


Here you decide which material property is controlled by the respective texture: Color, specularity, reflectivity, surface structure and so on and so forth. In my example with the bottle, the second texture slightly modifies the normals of the bottle’s surface, which results in a different shading on the edges… I guess. As I said: This is a material I created several years ago and I hardly ever worked with BI ever since!

IkariShinji, thank you for your explanations! They are of great use! Step by step I begin to see the forest through the trees.

Probably just an overlook - you’re limiting bottle render to half-transparent: http://www.pasteall.org/pic/show.php?id=88156

Eppo, thank you for your comment. There are so many parameters in Blender that it’s hardly possible not to forget to pay the attention to all of them… especially for beginners.