Cost of production

First off, apologies if this is in the wrong spot. I’m testing the waters to see what the costs of doing an animated series are. What I want to know is if the numbers I have found seem fair. If so, then I will start a kick starter to raise funds to try to put this show online. If not, then another month of research will be in order…

[TABLE=“class: grid, width: 500, align: left”]

Position
Salary

Modelers
~$68,000/year

Riggers
~$47,000/year

Texture Artists
~$47,000/year

Animators
~$67,000/year

Lighting
~$66,000/year

Effects
~$56,000/year

Voice Actors
~$40/hr

Producer (me)
$50,000/year

[/TABLE]

Thank you for any criticism, as that will help refine my searches.

Sincerely
Swatch

Personally, I think that you need to first be focused upon your script, and from this, a complete storyboard and production plan. If this is a series, you need to do this for several episodes.

Even if you hope to rely on “kickstarter” funding, you will need to have done this “due diligence” if you seriously expect to get any sort of money from anyone.

“Money? Yeah, I’ve got some. But one reason why ‘I’ve got some’ is that I know that, if I give some of it to you, I may never see it again. (Even if I am willing to lose it all, I damn sure don’t plan to.) Therefore, you’ve got to show me otherwise.”

This is, of course, how all business investment works. Before you can be a “producer,” you must be a “promoter.”

Have a listen to Barbara Streisand’s rendition of The Art of Making Art, on her original The Broadway Album. (Here’s a link to the lyrics: http://www.metrolyrics.com/putting-it-together-lyrics-barbra-streisand.html.)

Those lyrics are definitely autobiographical, because TBA#1 was definitely an album Barbara wanted to do. Stephen Sondheim graciously wrote these new lyrics to his song for her project.

“Advancing art is easy. Financing it is not.”

“Everytime I start to get defensive, I remember vinyl is expensive!”

Personally, I think that you need to first be focused upon your script, and from this, a complete storyboard and production plan. If this is a series, you need to do this for several episodes.

Even if you hope to rely on “kickstarter” funding, you will need to have done this “due diligence” if you seriously expect to get any sort of money from anyone.

“Money? Yeah, I’ve got some. But one reason why ‘I’ve got some’ is that I know that, if I give some of it to you, I may never see it again. (Even if I am willing to lose it all, I damn sure don’t plan to.) Therefore, you’ve got to show me otherwise.”

This is, of course, how all business investment works. Before you can be a “producer,” you must be a “promoter.”

Have a listen to Barbra Streisand’s rendition of The Art of Making Art, on her original The Broadway Album. (Here’s a link to the lyrics: http://www.metrolyrics.com/putting-it-together-lyrics-barbra-streisand.html.)

Those lyrics are definitely autobiographical, because TBA#1 was definitely an album Barbra wanted to do. Stephen Sondheim graciously wrote these new lyrics to his song for her project.

“Advancing art is easy. Financing it is not.”

“Everytime I start to get defensive, I remember vinyl is expensive!”