dll problem

(Makin Bacon) #1

i saved the runtime, placed in all the proper DLLs but when i put that all on my friend’s computer, uh oh!

‘C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\Desktop\avodec-51.dll is not a valid windows image Please check this against your installation diskette’

whats wrong with mah avcodec-51?!

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(Mmph!) #2

I think that DLL is for AVI codec, not sure why it gave you that error though the game engine dose not even support AVI files natively .

Did you do one of those hack scripts for movies to play in your game?

I remember that DLL from WINE or one of the movie players I installed in linux, I had to copy it over from windows partition.

A virus may have broken his version of the DLL too. ask him to run a updated virus scan on that file.

hope that helps…

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(Makin Bacon) #3

no, no movies. theres hardly anything in the game yet.

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(blendenzo) #4

Dare I ask it…

Is your friend running Windows Vista, per chance?

I’ve not heard yet if there are any significant problems with Vista compatibility due to Microsofts new “iron fist” security model… Sounds to me like that Windows install doesn’t trust your file for some reason, and I’ve never heard of XP doing that.

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(Mmph!) #5

I’ve never heard of XP doing that.

I have, after a virus corrupts a vital DLL file.
XP will give a simular warning if a vital EXE is tampered with.

ask your friend to run this:
http://www.clamav.net/download/

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(Mico27) #6

its avcodec-51.dll
I need that to run Pygame to play music or sounds in my game, and I run on Vista :slight_smile:

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(blendenzo) #7

Okay. Glad to hear that, guys. I’ve used XP rather extensively and never seen anything like that before, but most XP systems I use are rather well protected (behind routers, running firewalls, etc.). I I’ve hardly used Vista at all, so I thought perhaps it was a new phenomenon. I should know better. Sorry for the false alarm.

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(Makin Bacon) #8

nope she doest use vista. also, problem still not solved

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(Mmph!) #9

I leaned about it from clients coming into the shop.
We get lots of work un-#&$^ing infected systems thanks to P2P applications. Even people with the best routers get the problems, because that are too lazy to update a virus scanner and run a quick scan on downloaded files.(not to mention that they are usually thieves that deserve to get their belongings thrashed anyways)

I even encountered my first Linux virus the other day, the idiot thought that by running Ubuntu he was immune to viruses. But alas Linux viruses do exist, and yes that are damaging too.
Funny how people keep saying how easy Ubuntu is to install compared to windows.They dont take into account that Ubuntu dose not install a Firewall or take really any security measures other than assigning a sudo root password. (Thats right Ubuntu has no root password! it is the exact same one as the current user!!)
You linux guys should check out ClamAV, and Firestarter firewall.
Be sure to scan all incoming files too! (BTW Firewalls are to keep hackers,and the government out, and to make sure no applications try to phone home without your knowledge. Antivirus is your best bet to staying virus free.)

sorry for the novel :stuck_out_tongue:

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(blendenzo) #10

Ugh… I knew it was only a matter of time. A couple of corrections, though.

-Ubuntu does have a root password. Check “Users and Groups” in the “Administration” section. The root password is not initially set by the user, but you can change it if you want to (with your sudo powers, of course). Sudo just doesn’t require the user to have the root password in order to perform administrative tasks.

In its defense, sudo is better protection over administrative tasks than Windows XP offers by default (since Windows gives the default user root access to the entire system, allowing malicious programs to casually exploit that). The weakness of sudo is that a user with sudo powers (you can create lesser users without sudo powers) potentially could authorize malicious programs unknowingly, giving them root access to the system. Just like Windows, Linux is only as strong as the knowledge of the user.

-A Linux firewall will probably keep out most anything, since there is probably not any virus that knows how to deactivate it. But that is very weak security (“security by obscurity”). If the system is ever compromised, malicious software could (in theory) deactivate a Linux firewall in the same way malicious software commonly deactivates the built-in Windows firewall. The best firewall is always outside the system, because it is not subject to compromise. That is why a NAT router or a SmoothWall system (a separate, dedicated Linux-based firewall) is better than a software firewall. Software firewalls are great for telling you if your system is sending out packets that you didn’t intend to, though (indicating that your system has been compromised and is being used by malware against your will).

Antiviruses are good. Didn’t know about ClamAV, but I seem to recall that Avast also offers a Linux antivirus for free.

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(Mmph!) #11

Ubuntu does have a root password. Check “Users and Groups” in the “Administration” section. The root password is not initially set by the user, but you can change it if you want to (with your sudo powers, of course). Sudo just doesn’t require the user to have the root password in order to perform administrative tasks.

Yes, but this is not done by default when you install (just like I said). The first thing I do usually is get rid of sudo, and install SU or SUX.It is common knowledge that sudo is for n00bs. It supprises me too, the root password is one of the best things unix/linux has going for it (windows Vista even borrows the idea). There are lots of security features you can install in linux, they are just not done by default like in windows XP.

Just like Windows, Linux is only as strong as the knowledge of the user.

knowladge is power I will agree, but you sure need a lot less to run a windows system. Linux you need lots of reading to do even the most basic tasks. It is not really hard it is just time consuming.If a user wants to try out bleeding edge software they usually have to make major changes to their system by installing compatible libraries (and breaking things in the process) where in windows they are smart enough to just package the specialty DLL’s required.

That is why a NAT router or a SmoothWall system (a separate, dedicated Linux-based firewall) is better than a software firewall.

Check out lion virus,Ramen, and Remote shell… Even your firewalls can get infected, so be sure to scan every file you get kiddies,especially before you touch (chmod) a file.
None of what you said is installed by default (haha! I would love to see an installer make a physical system, then connect you to it.)

Well I still stand firm on what I said before. Windows SP2 is a lot more hassle free to install, and by default is safer than Ubuntu. Fedora is pretty close, they at least give you an option to install a firewall from the anaconda installer, but it still is not set on by default.Fedora also lets you have a real root password by default.(most linux distro’s do this). There are still a hole hell of a lot less viruses for linux, but that is changing quickly. As soon as we see either Ubuntu or fedora homogenize everything into 1 standard we will be seeing a whole hell of a lot more.

I personally have VMware set up on my home system. For surfing the internet I use a lightweight Debian based distro called Damn Small Linux, and a local NAT connection through a Proxy set up at work.
All my downloads are on the virtual system, and get scanned before I re-establish a SAMBA network to the host system.Then I scan them again in windows, just to be manic about it.

BTW thanks for the avast tip, I will give it a try later on today… ClamAV is pretty cool, but it has not got a GUI front end by default, and I really get tired of opening a terminal and executing my shortcut script. They have GUI’s for calmAV but I dont like any of them :frowning: they leave out features.

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