Engravings.

This is some recent work I’ve been doing. It’s super difficult to photograph because of reflections and all but you can get the jist of it I hope. It’s from a set of 12 glasses and one framing all engraved freehand with a diamond tip.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v625/fligh/Engv1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v625/fligh/Engv2.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v625/fligh/Engv3.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v625/fligh/Engv4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v625/fligh/Engv5.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v625/fligh/LeopEngv.jpg

Thanks to Photobucket for the hosting.

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you did the ornamets on the glasses?
they are fantastic!

Looks difficult to do, especially the first two! Very good!

I assume you did a drawing before you engraved, but what sort of technical limitations are there when you’re engraving the drawing? (I.E. you can’t have large areas of solidness, or lines can’t be too close together, or stuff like that.)

BTW, they look really great! 8)

/d_M

Fligh, this is stunning work. Do you sell the engraved glasses when they are complete?

When I work from photos, as I often do on comissions, I manipulate them in a paint proggy first to get good definition zones. Then I can just stick the photo behind the glass and trace it.
When I draw freehand I use acrylic paint on the glass, draw on it with pencil, then scratch thru the paint with the diamond.
When I do big (6X4 foot doors, screens or dividers) I paint wax on and transfer with a grid the pic or photo which I scratch with a wood pen then come back with a diamond.
For all 3 you can get away with about 5 ‘shade zones’, 2 of which will be raw scratch and 3 of which will be scratched and buffed. So you lay down the scratch-doublebuff layer first, then the hatch-and-buff, then the scratch-and-buff, then the light hatch and then the hard.
There are 2 tricks I had to learn before I could produce anything that wasn’t liable to shatter on the first cold night if it survived the trip to the customers home. First was the type of glass, which is all down to lead content and second is that the natural thing for a diamond on glass is to cut and that the cut will get longer and deeper as the glass expands and contracts with temperature change. So, just one cut and you start all over again, even if it’s just a little one made by accident.

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Wow! If only I had some hand-eye coordination…
And an artistic mind…
So what’s your profession? In general? Is it as specific as ‘scraper of things’ or are you an artist in other ways as well?

Lol. scraper of things is my main income. But most of what I scrape needs wood and sometimes leather and brass fittings. Eg; the sets of glasses get a custom made kist with brass hinges and corner cusps, wooden coasters turned on a lathe and inlaid with tooled leather in the same theme as the tooled leather inlays on the lid and internal doors. Then everything is lined with silk and velvet inside.
Doors, dividers, screens etc get wooden frames often with brass or bronze inlays and counter tops and tables are made from the ground up and sometimes the leather work can take longer than the glass.
I sometimes do saddles, saddlebags, gun scabbards or guncases, but most of my work is for people with horses, boats or horses and boats; in other words for people who only buy stuff that’s out of the price bracket of normal folk.

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