first attempt at photo real

I saw this post http://www.elysiun.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=28318 and made a rough image to help the guy out, but it turned out better than I thought. So I worked on it a bit and am really happy with the results. This is the first thing I have done in blender so please be kind. I really don’t know how to use all of the functions yet so if I forgot something please let me know. http://www.spoocher.com/blender/smlight.jpg

The way you did the chain turned out pretty good. Most light fixtures I’ve seen like that are usually held on to the ceiling with screws, yours appears to use glue or possibly magic :wink:
nice image!

actually miine looks exaxly like the one in my basement. There is a plate that you mount to the cieling then you push the fixture onto it and give it a half turn. kinda like the way a smoke detector goes on the wall. But if most people havn’t seen the newer kind then I may change my fixture to the old type.

"actually miine looks exaxly like the one in my basement. "

ok fair enough. well, I guess the next thing to do is to make the filament glow! good luck! :wink:

use three point lighting grasshopper… it will improve your image quality… and btw have you tried distributed raytracing yet?

http://www.elysiun.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=27552

it will allow your shadows to be soft and use shadow transp.

Or, if you don’t want to mess with a new patch, use an area light with raytraced shadows as well as a really slight spot. Keep it up. The ceiling’s texture looks weird. Too much noise. And if it looks like the one in your basement, change it. I don’t like your basement’s ceiling alá CG.

The light in your basement looks like a terrible design.
Does it really have the chain so close to the globe that it’s touching the glass like that?

Regards,
Caleb

Yeah, it looks like a cellar lamp from the fifties accidentally attached to the ceiling - nobody would ever design it like that - it makes no sense to stress the bulb every time you switch it on/off :D.

And the filament should be at the center of the bulb I think. The glass already looks good (except of the shadow, as mentioned before).

yes some of them do really have the chain that close. my neighbor across the street has one, and yes it probably is from the 1950’s. it’s an old house and has not had much renovation work.

I have to disagree with BlackMage. The 3 point lighting is not a magic bullet. The backlighting is not cumpolsary. It is done if you want to show an apple on a desk in it’s full glory. The backlighting has it’s origin in B&W movies. It is hard hard to see a the gray dress of a character in front of a gray wall, so they introduced backlighting to solve this problem. It is still cool though to see a thin glistening line on a subject, but you should use it wisely. Anyway, a fixture on a ceiling with 3-point lighting won’t work.
Instead try to simulate radiosity with bounce lights. bring a little variation (very lightly lit regions in the shadow).
Use better textures. Ones that show wear and aging tend to make a picture realistic.
Don’t use specular highlighting. Make the lightbulb reflective instead and make it reflect off camera objects like some white rectangles or something.
So, you’re shining a spotlight on the ceiling to reveal the lightbulb + armature? Then I’ll assume you using a torch/ flashlight. So, make to edge of the spotlight more soft, and use a transparant texture for the spot light that will look like those odd concentric circles you see when you use a flashlight.

The lightbulb shadow isn’t right. Most of the light would pass through a clear bulb like that, so you wouldn’t have a dark shadow. You might even be able to see a line for the filaments and definitely for the chain.

I’d get rid of the spotlight that you set up on the bulb… I’d replace it with a lamp or something because in the real world, there is no probably no spot illuminating a light bulb directly … it can be a different light ofcourse, in that case you’d have to tweak the light you have now…

Yes, caustics would really help this picture out, either fake it with a spotlight or use yafray for it.

I will do my best at doing that. I am very new to blender, only been using it for around a week. Therefore it will take me a bit to figure out how to doo the more advanced features.

But thank you all for the tips!

I think this is what you guys were talking about whith the shadow.
http://www.spoocher.com/blender/smlight2.jpg

The transparant shadow makes it look a lot better.
Now, the texture of the ceiling should be changed. Change it to stucci. Don’t map it to color, but map it nor. 'Tweak it a little. You’ll get a nice looking bump texture for your ceiling.
A rule of thumb is to not make the color of the specular reflection pure white.
For photorealism you should apply some color balance too. There is a thing that is called Tungsten balanced. This means that the photographic film will show a lamp as being white and outdoor light (sunlight) will look light blue. Then you have daylight balanced. This will make daylight look white and indoor light (candles , light bulbs) look yellowish.
So apply a color to your spotlight to suggest some kind of color balance.

If you are using a flashlight as your illumination source, you’re gonna have a some challenges to get photo real. Most flashlights use a reflector which means your going to have halos of area that are both much darker and that are much lighter instead of the uniform intensity you have right now.

There are also weird artifacts that are generally present in a light from a flashlight.

LetterRip

Better, but the transparent shadow looks a little wrong, a good lightbulb shadow should be just like in the first pic. you had with a lighter center.

Lettrrip wrote:

If you are using a flashlight as your illumination source, you’re gonna have a some challenges to get photo real. Most flashlights use a reflector which means your going to have halos of area that are both much darker and that are much lighter instead of the uniform intensity you have right now.

There are also weird artifacts that are generally present in a light from a flashlight.

I don’t think that is a problem. As I mentioned earlier, use a transparant texture for the lamp. Or better still, put some transparant concentric circles off camera and let them throw transparant shadows on the ceiling.

Since you are new to Blender I can tell you how to make those:

  1. add-> circle. Chose a decent number of vertices.
  2. hit E and hit return.
  3. hit S and scale down a little. You now have a flat ring
  4. In the side view select all vertices of this ring and extrude a little.

You may then sub-divide it, smooth it, bevel it or what ever.
Now to make concentric halos you just have to select the ring , dublicate it (shift + D) and scale it down.

You probaly have to tweak some things, mabye ad a little displacemt texture with clouds to the rings to make it somewhat irregular or whatever. Experiment a little.