Gladiators

Here’s another project from a little while ago, which I’ve revisited in recent days to make adjustments to some lighting issues that always bugged me. Murmillo vs Retiarius gladiator types in the arena.

Human character meshes made with the excellent Manuel Bastioni Lab and everything else modelled, textured and rendered in Blender, with a bit of post-processing in GIMP. The scene features a full arena (though circular rather than a proper amphitheatre, for simplicity) and over 35,000 spectators done through particle systems.

Main scene:


Close up:

Mock-marble:

Wireframe:

Alternative scene:

Arena:

Murmillo character:

Murmillo scene:

Short animation:

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You’re #featured! :tada:

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I like it! Totally dig the light burn. only thing that looks off in my opinion is his leg hair doesn’t look “right” but… may just be weird to look for reference for that…
The video did give me a thought (I do have thoughts every once in a great while). If you went from the viewport style to a eevee render animation to settling on the finished scene in cycles…
Anyways. totally dig it. Like the “Murmillo” blue cast hero shot. Also really liked the statue shots in the video!

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I love the composition of this work ! My only concerns are the weapons. They look brand new. All shiny and chromed. There isn’t any damage caused by the game and training.

Wow. Thanks Bart! :grinning:

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Many thanks for your comments.
Yes, I had the same thought about an Eevee version to cut to in the animation but I’m a total novice on that front so I couldn’t get it to look right. My next project is going to be Eevee-based - I’m quite late to the party on that front so need to get up to speed!

I love the composition of this work ! My only concerns are the weapons. They look brand new. All shiny and chromed. There isn’t any damage caused by the game and training.

Thanks!
There’s a bit of grunge on the weapons but yes I agree it’s a bit subtle and I’d probably add a bit more if I were doing it again. Having said that, I’m sure presentation and spectacle were just as important for a Roman audience as a modern one so the metal equipment would probably have been well polished at the start!