Guide to Mancandy

Forgive me if this question has been done already. My searches turned up hundreds of things people have done with Mancandy…

…but what I want it a “how to” intro on using the lil’ guy. Is there one?

And how come if I select the Mancandy mesh in Object mode and then go into Edit mode (to, say, make his nose longer) the main torso from waist up disappears?

Wanting to use Mancandy to speed up a bit of preproduction animation (likely to be done in Maya because of where I am studying). Right now he’s just confusing me.

Bassam (the creator of Mancandy) and the Blender foundation are coming out with a training DVD on how to use Mancandy … I don’t know the release date … but sometime soon …

But if you want some pointers … Bone layers - almost every bone layer is used (and for specific types of controls - IMO very hard to grasp for those new to armature animation) … the fingers are controlled by rotating and scaling … and if you are using the “Mr. Fantastic” version of Mancandy a lot of lattices …

If you are wanting a basic “block in” sort of rig you might want to look at something by Calvin or Sketchy’s Ludwig … Mancandy has developed into a very complex example of rigging/skinning possibilities in Blender …

… And does the “disappearing torso” reappear when you hit Alt-H ? If so most likely he needed to fix something in the legs and the torso got in the way somehow and he hid it from view and saved the file without restoring the rest of the mesh into view … like I said it has gotten very complex …

Thanks Vertex Pusher.

Yes, ALT-H does work. Lucky I asked, because I was assuming there was a layering problem and was about to go on a fruitless search in the file. Think I might also check out the Ludwig character you mentioned.

I’m a student now (after teaching eleven years) in a Media Design School here in New Zealand. They are wanting us to use Maya (even if we have to pirate versions of it) but I’ve always been fond of Open Source because it’s a legal alternative and this means I can later use it on as many machines as I like in any school I go to, if & when I return to teaching. Last week I made a 2D animatic showing all the ideas I would like to fit into my final student demo reel. They thought I’d used Adobe After Effects (which I don’t have) but really I’d mapped my scans as PNGs onto flat plains and moved them around in blender, pulling the whole thing together in the Video Sequence Editor. An interesting learning experience for me (although with all the texture associations and with having to unwrap textures before they show in 3D view, After Effects would have been faster)

Anyway… now they want the whole animatic thing redone but this time as a proper 3D version in two weeks time. They are requesting that I use Maya (the 3D “industry” in New Zealand wants their graduates to know Maya or 3D Studio because those are the main ones used out there at this time) although I’m still quite keen on doing some of the modeling in Blender, some in Maya so that I get skilled at both. I’m also thinking of slipping a few token things like Suzanne here and there. Hopefully there are people out there a bit more open minded who would recognise the subtly different slant.

Anyway, as I’m doing an Animation reel, slipping in Mancandy etc until I get my own characters modeled & rigged is another way I can “easter egg” bits of Open Source recognition into my reels. Other students are using simple cube characters or “blocky” characters made by tutors for class use.