Has this feature been overlooked?

  1. Currently in a Blender two-dimensional viewport, objects can only be manipulated in two dimensions via the mouse. Given that a common feature of current mice is a Mouse Wheel, can the wheel not be utilized to allow movement of objects in three dimensions?

An object could be positioned in two dimensions on the screen with the mouse, and the Mouse Wheel can be scrolled to “push” or “pull” the object on the orthogonal, third axis.

Does this feature exist yet? If a noob such as I can imagine such an increase in functionality, surely the more experienced users have deliberated upon this topic and voted yay or nay about it’s development.

  1. Elements of my animation are positioned via Snap To Grid (STG). When I attempt a more detailed placement of objects, I discover that only one level of detail exists to the STG-grid. As I zoom an object, the grid (in orthogonal mode) continues providing more levels of detail. Each major grid division always has ten subdivisions. But STG only snaps to the uppermost level of detail and not to the ever-tinier division marks.

Giving Blender the ability to STG to any one of the ten divisions, no matter the level of zoom, would increase by many orders of maginitude the ability to create fine levels of detail.

Does this option exist and am I simply being noob-ish?

Bob

i agree with the second part - a more sophisitcated and interactive snapping system like in maya or xsi would be great. abt the first part - not sure why you would need this. in orthogonal viewports there is no way to tell the position of an object along the axis perpendicular to the screen (except guessing by intersections), so why moving it along this axis?? switching view is lightning-fast, and many ppl work in multiple viewports anyways.

Note that holding down the ctrl key also does the snap to grid units (if you don’t have snap to grid option on). Holding down the shft and ctrl keys at the same time allows for snapping in tenths of grid units (again without snap to grid option). You can also press the “n” key and place the object numerically. Also under View->Properties in the 3d window header you can adjust the grid spacing which also effects the resolution of the snap to grid. Below is an example with snap to grid on as you have said you have.

eg. with snap to grid preference on and grid spacing set to 0.1 then:

  1. with no key pressed grid snaps to 1.1, 1.2 etc.
  2. with ctrl key pressed – free movement
  3. with shift key pressed snapping is by units of 0.01

As others have stated I don’t think that the scroll button axis idea is very useful. Note also that it is only in the orthogaphic views (xy, yz, or xz planes) that movement in all directions not possible with the mouse. Try turning your view so it isn’t on one of the orthographic views and try pressing gx, gy, and gz.

Hope this helps,
GreyBeard

I think you’ve confused some things

holding control alone snaps to 1.0 times grid size
holding shift alone doesn’t snap to the grid, but the object doesn’t move as fast as the cursor
holding both shift and control snaps to 0.1 times grid size

the default grid size is 1.0, but you can easily change it in the view properties which changes what is snapped to

holding control alone snaps to 1.0 times grid size
holding shift alone doesn’t snap to the grid, but the object doesn’t move as fast as the cursor
holding both shift and control snaps to 0.1 times grid size

This is true if you don’t have “snap to grid” set in user preferences. The functions of shift and control change when you have snap to grid set. Try it and see. I read the initial post and interpreted that he had “snap to grid -> grab/move” set in user prefs – I could have been wrong (I often am :D). I tried to make the distiction between the modes clear in my post but I guess I wasn’t successful.

GreyBeard