How did you learn how to blend so well???

No seriously. I want to know how. what tutorials got you blending like a pro. what books are the best. what books are good. please no crap. stay on topic . even it is off topic

practise
practise
practise
practise
practise
practise
practise
practise
+talent
+artistic ability
=good blenderateer

http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/emoticons6/78.gif.

( * ) http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/emoticons6/11.gif (butt-kissing) will get you everywhere.

It’s just like http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/emoticons6/59.gif said, practise is the best thing. Just make challenging projects that means you have to learn how to do stuff.

Experiment too. Don’t always think how do I do… and then look for an online tutorial. Try and see if you can do it yourself first - seriously, that’s how you learn. I did all the tutorials that come with Maya and then I did a project of my own and I didn’t know where or how to begin. It took me about 1 month to get my first model right but after that first animation, I never forgot the stuff.

yep. start pressing buttons and move sliders. also try to learn uv texturing and making textures with a program like paintshop. that seems the key to making very nice renders.

I never used a Tuturial. Just looked at Other .blend files, and Testing and Trying And Trying. And i Just messed around ,But then Suddenly i got things to work, and then i found more things out, After I havent stoped Learning :slight_smile:

no tutorials here (ever)

just practice.

but i am pretty crappy so don’t judge it by me

Alltaken

im the same as them up there practise i looked at one tutorial and didnt understand lol so i tought myself and asked NOR.J some things :P.

i dont want to be your teatcher Grimreaper, just so that is Clear :wink: I am still Learning to you know?..

erm yea…i think lol :expressionless:

It is very important to have an open eye for your environment. Learn how light flows, how spilled water affects material properties and always ask yourself how you would do it in blender.

Some things I gave myself as tasks:
Simulating sea bed caustics with lamp textures
Simulate spilled liquid on the floor (e.g. blood) with different mapping types
Simulating bubbles under water (so they don’t look like water drops)

This is how I like to learn - seeing something in real world an then trying to make it as good as possible in Blender.

PS: Don’t listen to Alltaken, he is one of the worst Blenderers out there!

I read about 5 different books on 3D, modelling, texturing, lighting, animation… All of those books I read before even touching any 3D program… You’d say that I’d be a freaking pro at this by now, but I realised that knowing theory is only half the battle … or less…

Then the practising fase comes… practise alot, do tutorials, and most of all don’t give up … furthermore I had abotu 5+ years of experience in and around design projects…

One thing to remember is this … most of the time a project can look like crap and then the difference between crap and good looking is just a few tweaks away… that’s where the don’t give up factor comes in…

Hope you’ll find all of these replies helpfull…

<<<<PRACTICE>>>>
and
<<<<PRACTICE>>>>
and
<<<<PRACTICE>>>>
and
<<<<PRACTICE>>>>
and
<<<<PRACTICE>>>>
and
<<<<PRACTICE>>>>
(and some tutorials too)

your forgetting 1 thing
<<<<PRACTICE>>>>

:smiley:

I shouldn’t really be posting here, as I’m not all that good with Blender, but I use the “trial and error” method of blending: if you try something, and fuck it up, keep trying until you get it right. Or until 3 weeks has passed and you just say “Screw it”.

I wouldn’t say I’m good yet, but I learned alot from doing tutorials, and fiddling with stuff. Also, I see something and say “Hey, I bet I could do that in Blender!” So I try. I usually fail on the overall scale, but I almost always learn something new.

d_m

every day i learn something new :P.

I’m not one of these pro’s, but advice I would give is be ambitious, do something that will challenge you (as has been said before) but don’t get ahead of yourself. Break it into parts, eg. learn some modelling, get comfortable with that,make a good model. Make the model in parts too, like if you make a human, do the head and make it good, when you are happy with it you work on the torso till you are happy with it, then you do the arm…hand…etc. Trying to do too much at once can confuse you and cause loss of interest. Once you are comfortable with the modelling and have your model, start learning how to uvmap, when you are good with that start with texturing etc etc.

Well, this is one way. I am finding it works for me as I am not overwhelming myself with stuff, so I can focus on one thing till it feels natural, then when I am learning a new area I can focus fully on it.

Patience and practice, the 2 main things on becoming a good modeler. You first experiment with simple things and move up.

sucking on pineapples is a good way too.

gets a lot of people to high places in life.

Alltaken

Pineapples? :o

Ouch!