How do you see the future of 3D?

Hi all! I love 3D graphics and I already knew that I would be doing this for a long time. I have a question, a creative question. I understand that making 3D models and animations is very nice, you can use and develop in this in many projects. And yet, I try to think about the future, about big projects, mobile applications, NFT, and much more. I was wondering what you think about the future of 3D graphics, maybe you have ideas that you want to implement, maybe you dream of global projects. I want to create this topic as motivational. Please write all your thoughts about it, even the craziest ones. I think this can help not only me, but also everyone who has already thought about something more. Sorry for my banality, but I’m really interested in your thoughts.

Hi.

AI algorithms will certainly take a bigger part in 3D animation. Such tools will eventually assist 3D animators more than they currently do:

Same for 3D modeling: there will come a time when tools will be able to generate 3D objects from an image or a prompt.

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Thank you! Very interesting to read and watch. I have already seen a few videos about the cascadeur software, I think I need to try to work with this software somehow. Thanks a lot!

I’m not sure if you’re familiar with what an NFT actually is, but it doesn’t seem like something that fits on that list. It’s not the image, animation, or model itself, an NFT is just a hyperlink or other relatively small data embedded in blockchain, and then typically used as an excuse to try to sell that thing for an exorbitant amount of money - often with far less success than crypto enthusiasts promise. It basically operates as a form of receipt, but there are plenty of other ways of selling and transferring ownership of digital content without them, arguably more efficient and effective ones as well. Because it’s immutable, if the asset that’s pointed to by the NFT moves, the NFT now points to nothing. The NFT is never anything other than the blockchain token itself - images and 3D work are too big to fit onto it and remain entirely separate entities.

As for NFTs and the Metaverse (the only “meaningful” NFT and 3D related project I can think of) or video games, because the average person hates micro-transactions, they’re not going to want them replaced with macro-transactions. Whatever the future of 3D entails, I don’t think it’s the dystopian NFT paygate locked-down web 3.0 metaverse projects crypto enthusiasts and corporations keep trying to convince us we want unless we’re all really, really unlucky. Disposable incomes simply aren’t high enough for the average person to throw away the kind of money people hope to make on even the smaller NFT sales.

Ubisoft, Daz3D, Epic, and other corporate and crypto interests have financial incentive to hope if they keep pushing the tech, people will pay hundreds or thousands of real dollars/euros/whatever on a skin, avatar, profile pic, video game/Metaverse/VR real estate, etc. instead of a few bucks, but in the real world most people are too busy trying to figure out how to cope with skyrocketing costs for rent, food, gas and utilities, etc. Resources, including water and arable land are going to get scarcer, so while the current economic downturn will probably improve, there will be more in the future.

We don’t need the MetaVerse as an escape from that either, because frankly we already have better games (whether console, PC, or even VR) than what Zuckerberg and other metaverse proponents are offering. Better looking ones too - does Zuckerberg not have any professionally qualified game artists or devs on his payroll? I mean, for crying out loud, when selling us on the future at least sell us something that looks as good as what we can do now! The Metaverse we’re being threatened with looks exceptionally dull (not just graphics, but even content and purpose), nothing close to it’s namesake, lots of focus on monetization and tech, but ultimately devoid of fun and if Zuckerberg’s vision wins, devoid of privacy as well.

And I think a lot of people will continue to prefer traditional video games over VR, or a future where we jack our brains straight into them. (Could be third person gamer bias, but I don’t want to imagine a depressing world where all games are first person).

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Very detailed and interesting. I understand that NFT can not be attributed to this now, but if you look at it from the point of view that it allows you to earn money on models and make 3D spaces for each artist personally with the possibility of independent earnings, then you can look at it as a support resource. I think about it this way, but this is at the moment, I don’t know what can happen with it tomorrow)) But it doesn’t matter. For the most part, I want to touch on the issue of integrating new technologies, maybe I wrote too abstractly))

“NFT” is a much over-hyped way of (maybe …) marketing your work, but it is no substitute for a registered copyright. In the US, this costs $35 (covering a “collection” of works for one price), and of course you can do it on-line at copyright.gov. The registration takes legal effect immediately.

Once you’ve got the “Certificate of Title” for your brand-new car securely in your hot little hands, thus proving that you actually do own it and therefore are entitled to sell or license it, you can then proceed any way you please and “good luck.” But, “Mind your P’s and Q’s.”

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I think registering a copyright for 3D content is super unnecessary and a waste of money.
As soon as you create something yourself (and is not a copy of something existing) it is automatically your intellectual property and yours no matter what… correct me if I am wrong.
Us modelers can always proof the origin of our own work, right?

Maybe if you are bad with making back ups and stuff, you might run into issues, and a registered copyright might be a good idea in this case… but other than that, I would rather save the money, lol

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It’s your intellectual property, yes, but a copyright is a legal defense. I don’t think it’s worth putting a copyright on what you do generally, but if you make something that’s worth a lot to you, and someone steals it and copyrights it, technically it’s theirs now. You can try to fight it in court, but it’s a lot cheaper to just get a copyright in the first place.

Again, I don’t think it’s worth it generally, but for something like a script or a soundtrack or an original character, it very well could be

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Thank you! Useful information