If your math teacher did a Blender unit....

…how would you want him/her to do it?

I’m a teacher at a US independent high school. What’s the most a high school kid could get out of a few hours of blender?

Some aspects of Blender are right out of our Geometry textbook: points/verts, edges/segments, faces, n-gons… but some aspects like setting up the windows and the interface may frustrate kids before they get to the fun stuff.

Right now I use it as a demo tool with a projector. Do you think it’s possible for high school kids to tackle using it themselves and have fun while doing it?

R

I’m twelve and i’ve been using blender for several years (a while before I joined elysiun) and I have no problems understanding it and certainly enjoy it :smiley: … but then again i’m not your average 12 year old so the main reaction you get might be different. But I wish you taught at my school :stuck_out_tongue: I have on occasion found my knowledge of blender quite useful during maths lessons.

Oh yeah, they’ll problably get it, I started at 11 no problem. But instead of going stright ot the lesson see if you can’t devote 2 minutes to the use of the 3d window. do a basic “blender for dummies” tutorial on scaling, rotating, etc. they problably won’t need materials or particle systems from what you described, but so long as you have 3 button mouses and explain a good deal about basic modelling, then they should pick it up pretty quick. (Of course every class i’ve been in has the stupid-as-all-hell popular/girl boy (not to sterotype popular kids, but there are some that cant put two and two together for their lives) who’ll never get it unless you give him/her a lesson on blender aimed at three year olds.)

And if you didn’t want to waste valuable teaching time having them set up their default view, you could just save your default .blend to a disk and copy it to their computers. Just an idea.

I’d say your wasting time teaching software that has nothing to do with math. But its a great way to consume time! If you were teaching art, it would be easier to use the standard manual tools since it would take more than a school year to have a significant part of the students actually producing art with Blender.

My opinion…

I don’t think the point is for the students to create art. I think the point is to teach students the behavior of Euclidian geometry in space . … sorta a visualization. You could do this in another piece of software, but why not try it in blender. It will give them an example of the math being taught being used in real life.

I don’t think the point is learning art either. Nor did I say that. The title has something about “math teacher” in it.

but why not try it in blender

…because you can’t teach Euclidean geometry with blender. Unless of course the teacher needs to consume time. Think of it, spend a significant part of the class learning a tool to visualize a sphere or cube or cylinder. Like wow man, it blows my mind :o There’s more to math than visualization.

It will give them an example of the math being taught being used in real life.

…say what…maybe use it in english class?

Basically, all the studies are showing computer-assisted learning actually handicaps the student. This is no surprise.

Hmmm… you sure about that?

What about all the lessons that could be learned about graphing, scaling, vectors, tangents, normals, booleans, etc…

…I mean the whole thing is all about math.

It’s been 10 years since I took calculus, and today, I wish I could go back with what I have acquired in Blender, because terms that were really only understood in black and white and pen and paper then have real meaning to me today.

Basically, all the studies are showing computer-assisted learning actually handicaps the student. This is no surprise.

What studies… got any links? Or are you just taking it from a raving old man that claims “They don’t even teach math in school no more, now they got calculators and multiculturalism!”

To answer the fisrt question… it depends on what grade level you are teaching, but I bet scaling may be an easy concept to pick up in a couple of hours.

What about all the lessons that could be learned about graphing, scaling, vectors, tangents, normals, booleans, etc…

…teach these concepts with BLENDER! roflmao!

What studies… got any links?

…no I don’t since they’re in peer-reviewed journals. I would be happy to give them to you, but you’d have to find a library that has access.

Or are you just taking it from a raving old man

Hey, don’t talk about my neighbor like that, I like him.

You guys are hopeless blender fans :smiley: Me too, but not for a high school math class (unless your goal is to consume time).

Are you suggesting the concepts are too hard, or are too easy?

I don’t even understand why you think blender would be a poor tool to teach math with. Actually, with the comments you are making, I wonder how much you even know about Blender, or about educating high school students.

…how would you want him/her to do it?

I’m a teacher at a US independent high school. What’s the most a high school kid could get out of a few hours of blender?

Some aspects of Blender are right out of our Geometry textbook: points/verts, edges/segments, faces, n-gons… but some aspects like setting up the windows and the interface may frustrate kids before they get to the fun stuff.

Right now I use it as a demo tool with a projector. Do you think it’s possible for high school kids to tackle using it themselves and have fun while doing it?

Of course yes. I’ve done some experiments with Blender in the Descriptive Geometry field. I think that It would be possible to make a whole study programme about Descriptive Geometry using Blender. I think that Blender is a great tool for teachers.

Experiment:

I wonder how much you even know about Blender, or about educating high school students.

roflmao :smiley: stop…stop (eyes tearing now)

You win, I’m now convinced by your powerfully persuasive arguments that blender is indeed suitable to teach with high school math.

in my mind…grimey is a bit of an idiot.

(i will probably never look at this thread again either, so any attempts to reply to me will be totally useless, im a busy man)

Now I’m really roflmao…

I’ll call the guys in the white suits, he might hurt himself with all of that maniacal laughter and rolling on the floor, and he is taking at least 40 minutes to come up with 2 sentences in retort.

Grimey you’re wrong! I think it would be not to hard to learne the students Blender. Im 14 years old and learned the basics pretty quick. There are a lot of math in Blender even in the basic operations as scale, subdivide and stuff. If I would try to learn them Blender I would show them what kind of things you can create with it, so they should be more motivated to learn it.

…hey, I agree with you, teach blender. The powerful, fact-filled personal attacks only convince me more that you are correct. For the life of me, I cannot see how anyone could come to a conclusion that would be different than yours.

randomd sir,

I’m no math genius nor am I any good at maths but you should use some blender in your math lessons, good way to promote Blender to the world :smiley:

You know what? You could even teach them the coordinate system used in maths and draw a picture by extruding vertices from the origin :wink: I don’t think telling them to press the E button while holding the Ctrl button would be too hard a task.

:smiley:

Wolf

Don’t worry. The personal attacks aren’t there to convince you of anything related to the topic. They are just a natural response to trolls.

…something unsettling about you, like we’ve met before…

…something unsettling about you, like we’ve met before…

…your nightmares