Is there any 3d artists who can't model humans?

Hi

I’m on the verge of giving up making human models.

after learning 3d about a year, now I can make interior scene alright, food props nearly look real, mechanic stuffs ok, kitchen instalments and furnitures easily now.

But I can’t make any decent looking human at all.

The stinging part is, I’ve learned fine arts for years, learned 3d for a year, but I’ve seen OTHER people who’ve learned 3d for 3 months then make professional looking human heads so easily.

Sculpting doesn’t help. I’ve tried polygon modeling, sculpting, sub-d, patch modeling, nothing works.

Is there any 3d artist who can’t or won’t model humans?

I can make robot hands, I don’t know why I can’t make human hands at all.

I’m thinking of giving up on human modeling. Maybe some people just can’t.

I’ve asked same question before and people answered I have to learn anatomy. But I know some anatomy, I just don’t understand how polygon or 3d clay works.
and while other people can pull a professional level game character within 3-6 months of learning, I still struggle with simple humans.

I can draw 2d human, can make human head with my hands(not 3d, with real clay), but I can’t make 3d human.

Maybe I’m not talented.

Some people don’t come straight into 3D from no art experience at all. People who spent three months learning may already have had several years experience in say cley modelling which is easily transformed onto a computer screen.

Personally, I still struggle with humans and other organic models though I’ve been learning Blender on and off for a few years. Previously, I had very, very little with graphical knowledge so I had to learn an absolute ton to get into it. Organic modelling is much more difficult to master than hard-surface modelling; organic requires you to understand how shapes are built, where flows should go, and why. It’s usually recommended that you learn how to draw as well for this reason.

I had a look at the Blenderella series a while back, but I found it was simply too high-level for my experience at that time, so I burnt out trying to keep up and copy what she was doing in the video series. In the end I put it aside in order to develop simpler models. I’m working through the series now and finding it much easier. If you feel confident with your abilities to model basic objects and you want to develop character models, look up tutorial series (like Blenderella) and have a look at the topology of a few models on the likes of Blendswap. You’ll learn a [b]ton[b] doing it. It’s wise to give yourself assistance where you can. However, if you feel you can’t follow what’s going on in those kind of tutorials yet, back-down a little bit and look for something simpler.

Modelling is like playing an instrument, and learning an instrument usually comes in stages; the novice, the beginner, the intermediate, and (eventually), the advanced. Don’t rush past one step.

I’ve asked same question before and people answered I have to learn anatomy. But I know some anatomy, I just don’t understand how polygon or 3d clay works.
and while other people can pull a game character within 3-6 months, I still can’t make simple humans.

I can draw 2d human, can make human head with my hands(not 3d, with real clay), but I can’t make 3d human.

You need to learn topology in this case, not anatomy.

Hi Kurtis,

Nowadays I see many people on internet who’ve just learned zbrush or max then start to make very good looking human models right away.
I started to think that this speed is ‘average’, and I am retarded compared to them. That was painful part.

There are even many teenagers who can make game characters for their MODs, while I can’t make basic human. This is frustrating.

I’m from traditional artists environment, maybe my head is not tuned for 3d.
Though I love hard surface modeling.

Your advice is great and helping, but I feel like I’m way behind other people. If I have to spend another year to learn topology just to make basic human, that would kill my confidence which is already below zero.

But again I appreciate your advice, it’s just me really depressed.

Thx Kurtis.

If you’ve got traditional art skills, you know hard-modelling techniques, and you have clay experience, then it shouldn’t take you anywhere near a year to learn organic modelling. You won’t do it overnight, but consistent practice should yield a result you’ll be pleased with much, much sooner than that.

Everyone has different strengths and weaknesses. I still can’t put pencil to paper atm, and I think that’s my largest setback because it’s holding back my texturising and other skills. To be able to draw and model characters would be my greatest accomplishment and it’s something that I’ve been working towards for a while.

People may look to you, what you can accomplish now, and say ‘he’s really advanced!’ You are, if you can handle modelling hard-surfaces, drawing and clay building. Sometimes it just takes the right person, the right hand, and the right way to jostle you into place. Like I said before, maybe you should look into good tutorials on the internet like Blenderella (though that’s one of many), or if possible, find someone in your local area who’s willing to sit down with you and guide you for a while.

This was my logic: I’ve learned 3d for a year->I’m supposed to be able to make anything other 1 year-level people can make->if not=I’m incompetent.

I’ve spent more time making crappy low poly face, while I can easily make many other stuffs.

It still hurts that some kids who makes MODs are better than me, but maybe I should accept my limits and start to combine things I already can ahieve.

I’m very good at pencil drawing, I draw my own illustrations for texturing. Well, that can be a plus.

Maybe…I’ll just put human modeling aside a while, and focus on other modelings… while learning topology and 3d anatomy again.

At least you lifted my mood a lot, Thx very much.