Joan of Arc & Sane Spines

(Star Weaver) #1

I was just taking a look at the Joan of Arc tutorial again, and I noticed that the model and reference art used both have the same time kind of deformed, scoliosis-tending forward thrust lower back area that me and my fiancee were critiquing in the City of Heroes and World of Warcraft (Night Elf at least) female character design.

I was just thinking about how this has been one of the primary sources of teaching character modeling for what, years now? And it has this kind of bizarre hyper-perfctionist stylization or whatever you would call that …

It also makes me wonder if there are any tutorials on modeling “real” people, instead of superstars. I mean, I know there are alternatives to Joan that some people claim are superior these days, and I’ll go looking for some of them later, but . . .

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(IamInnocent) #2

I’d like to compare: what are those alternatives?
At first sight you could use real people photos as references and the techniques taught in Joan of Arc but that’s too simple an answer and you certainly thought of it already.
I find the tutorials for modeling a whole high polys character a bit lacking when it comes to teaching beginners in 3D who use Blender. I am thinking of making a complete one myself and your answers would help me define what it should be.

Jean

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(BeBraw) #3

Modeling is mostly about knowing your subject and tools well. In character modeling proper knowledge of anatomy will definitely help you. You can extrapolate information needed for modeling based on your knowledge of bone and muscle structure. This will help in rigging as well. Remember that rigging is not just about creating a skeleton. It’s about simulating the underlying structure in a convincing way.

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