Maxwell Materials - How?

So I hope this is a relevant thread for some people, because honestly I don’t see how this is a material.:spin:

http://resources.maxwellrender.com/imagenes/script/big/BrownStones_2667.jpg

I honestly have no Idea how they did this. Is it an actual material, or is it just called that and actually made of mesh?

Sorry if this has already been discussed to death elsewhere.

I feel this is relevant here because my first instinct is: Can I try this in cycles :wink:

It’d say it’s more of a complex shader combined with micro-displacement.

As for trying it in Cycles, Cycles does have a basic implementation of microdisplacement accessed with the feature set changed to experimental but finishing it is currently a low priority.

Hmm, so its procedurally generated?

I was thinking along the lines of displacement, but some of the stones seem rounded from the bottom, getting wider, then narrowing again. Now that I look at it closely, it seems that is not the case.

And in this case, how loosely is term shader used? Is it more like a texture with really good bump map, but better integrated?

Thanks,

Jonathan

What the dragon said, it probably micro-displacement Lux-Render has this feature I don’t know how this impacts render time though. Reyes based engines have been doing this for years now.

In Render Panel change “Feature Set” to Experimental (it shows Supported).
Now select the mesh in the viewport and go to the Object Data panel (and there a new subpanel called Displacement appears
for that mesh and you change the Method to True. The option Use Subdivision there will be the micro-displacement that can do what Maxwell does). But as seen in the image below is not working yet. That is why it is in Experimental, because is not working yet.

About a spectral renderer: Compare side by side this image from Cycles and the one in first post of this thread. That “realism” is what a spectral render gives (in the test scene from Maxwell it is using lamps, not HDR) dividing the light in several wavelengths and then calculating each one. That creates the realism, versus the “comic” look of non spectral renders.
In a non spectral renderer more realism can be done using HDR lighting. It enhances the realism because it is like using very different wavelengths. Using lamps you would need using an array of lights with variations to the main light to achieve such thing.

http://desmond.imageshack.us/Himg152/scaled.php?server=152&filename=rocksy.jpg&res=landing

Its probably just a texture with displacement. people call these materials.