multiple camera render

Hello,

Does anyone know if its possible to have two different camera views animating simultaneosly in a single blend file? In other words, each frame of the final avi video would have two views of the same object?

Thanks,
brian311

You can have any numbers of camera viewing the same scene with different angles. Use Chamera Change Script.
I have answer this a few days ago in this thread.
http://blenderartists.org/forum/showthread.php?t=140125

But with this you can see some frame range with one camera, and some other frame range with other camera. But You want Half View with One camera and half view with another camera. I have done this type of work with one other way. Render them separately and then join.

Thanks kkrawal,

That’s cool, but is there a way to do something like a having a picture within a picture for the final avi video?

brian311

I’m generalising, but I think you can place separate cameras on separate layers, create a new ‘scene’ for each camera (shot), then assign the layers from you main scene, to your newly create scenes.

so if you have 4 layers in your main scene (1) and two additional scenes (2 & 3) you can have:

Scene 1

Layer 1: Mesh
Layer 2: Lights
Layer 3: Camera 1
Layer 4: Camera 2

Scene 2

Layer 1: Mesh
Layer 2: Lights
Layer 4: Camera 2

Scene 3

Layer 1: Mesh
Layer 2: Lights
Layer 3: Camera 1

Once you’ve organized your assets this way, you should be able to render out scenes 2 & 3, with the standard render UI one after the other. Or use the compositor to render both scenes out at the same time.

The compositor will also take care of your pic in pic idea…

Thanks Raskie,

I’ll give this a try.

brian311

Hi,

I’m sorry for asking b/c I’m sure someone has asked this before, but I couldnt find a solution.

I have a building with an interior that I fly through with the camera. I would like to get the interior get faded in with a gradient effect into the building while the camera is inside. So at first the inside of the building is empty as the camera progresses the interior (all seperate objects) gradually fades in.

Any ideas or tips?

Thanks, Twan

Separate your render passes guys! You don’t need to render the whole scene all at once!

You can render the full image sequence with one camera, and render the full image sequence with the other camera, and put them back together in the Video Sequence Editor whichever way you want to. This step is called ‘compositing’. There are many options to combine the images (multiply, alpha over, etc…), and you can also use transitions like fade-ins, wipes, etc…

Separating your render passes allows you full control over the elements in your scene and allows you to combine the images in any way you want to :yes:

It also has another benefit: the ability to cancel a render without losing your progress! If you render to an image sequence, you can cancel the render at any time and resume from the frame you were on… so if your render doesn’t finish over night, no worries! Just stop the render, and you can use Blender during the day, then resume the render the next night… :smiley:

feelgood’s got the prime smoke, folks – for max versatility do the work as separate passes and combine into “split-screen” (as the described effect is called) post-render using the Compositor. Besides the benefits he noted, you’ll also have exact control over timing & screen positioning, which you can do in a single-pass setup, but is much easier to tweak if doing it in post.

From experience I can say that using the multiple-scene/multiple camera approach can be done but is more than a little complex to set up and execute properly – it takes a lot more tweaking and adjustment than using two separate render passes and combining later. Any time that might be saved in a single-pass render (debatable) will be more than spent in setup and adjustments. IMO.

On the other hand there are specific situations (not a simple split-screen, however) where it is of benefit to use the multi-scene approach, such as using a perspective camera in one scene and an ortho camera in the other, but with common subject & lighting arrangements, or one Linked camera being shared between Scenes to capture two setups from exactly the same angle, more I’m sure that I haven’t yet discovered.