Music laws


(Roffey) #1

I don’t know whether or not if this is in the right place - so I’ll apologise now just in case.

Anyway, I’ve managed to get a group together to make a series of video shorts using blender - however, I’m unsure about laws concerning the use of Artist music as soundtrack. Do I have to pay a royalty fee or do I pay authorisation?


(Burre) #2

This should probably be discussed in the off-topic forum.

I don’t know if the same rules apply internationally but this is the swedish organization that handles “licenses” for public performance (like radio and such). It might have information you look for since it deals with international customers also. However, I think most of these agreements are made between bands/record companies.

Page (english version): http://www.stim.se/stim/prod/stimeng.nsf/AllDocuments/DEFF5E5F082F385DC1256E8500303119


(mzungu) #3

Maybe you could find something here to use?


(Dittohead) #4

Moved to offtopic. Next time read the the forum descriptions :slight_smile:


(juanjavier) #5

—Freeplaymusic is limited to educational purposes mostly, unless you intend to release a full length feature film thru a major US studio. Any other use (short films made with Blender to upload them later to your web, as will be my case in the future) requires a signed licence contract.

This leads to my next question: Does anybody know where I could find real free music that I can use freely as the soundtrack of my (still in the works) 3D film conceived, pre-produced, modelled, lighted, rendered and post-produced entirely within Blender?

In other words: “Open source music” for an open source film?

Thanks in advance.


(3D-Penguin) #6

I don’t know wether it suits your taste but classical music (older than 70 years i think) is completely free. You could use a midi-player to render them from your own arrangement.
Using other peoples pre-arranged midis might have other pitfalls. You certainly would have a nice sound which is guaranteed by the use of sounfonts. To enable you to use them hardware and (soundcard) memory independently you want to use some software which can handle that.
Ex. Softsynth and others for Win and many for Linux (search Sourceforge).

Cambo (aka Ideasman) has not only made great scripts for Blender but also amazingly good soundfonts which you can still download via Hammersound. Mozart “Kleine Nachtmusik” on a (Soundfont) Steinway piano rendered with Softsynth gives you such a clear channel separation that you don’t believe that its only a consumer soundcard which plays it. Try it man, it sounds just absolutely great.

Hope that helps.


(juanjavier) #7

----Of course classical music suits me, but I was thinking about something more “personal” and less “popular” as classical music is.

BTW: How could I trace Cambo (aka Ideasman), his scripts for Blender, his soundfonts and Hammersound?

Great you helped. Thanks…


(3D-Penguin) #8

BTW: How could I trace Cambo (aka Ideasman), his scripts for Blender, his soundfonts and Hammersound?

I don’t understand your question properly, but if you mean how i found Cambos soundfonts, that was pure coincidence when i was browsing the Hammersound archive and remembered his real name. Already knowing about the quality of his work, his fonts where the first i tried and was not a bit disappointed. There is even a font with his own voice, (uuhm did i say too much?).

The hint i gave you is in the use of hardware independent sounfont software together with well made big soundfonts. That will work on ANY soundcard proper software like Softsynth provided.