My first HDR Panorama! Yay!

It’s my first HDR panorama! :smiley:

…with a golden christmas ball instead of a silver one…

…that is only fifteen years old.

It sucks, I know, but for enviroment or >0.100 Roughness glossy it’s OK
…except for the washed out color because it was a golden ball.

I don’t think anyone would want this, but here it is anyways
http://depositfiles.com/files/iqeqk65yx

So, have you done an HDR pano? How was it?

PS: Now for a useful thing. How can I fix the edges sharpness and the big black hole that appears just in the opposite end of where it was shot?


So, have you done an HDR pano? How was it?

PS: Now for a useful thing. How can I fix the edges sharpness and the big black hole that appears just in the opposite end of where it was shot?

I’ve done some mirrorball panos, and also have designed with real optics as an engineer, so I kinda know what is going on. Here are some tips:
-You want the mirror ball image as ortho as possible. You also want that black hole as little as possible. It’s not possible to eliminate it unless you take several different angles and do some ugly compositing, but you can reduce it’s size to a minimal level, one of two ways:
– Take your picture from overhead looking down. That puts the black hole on the floor where your feet would be, which makes it unlikely to see it with normal viewing directions. (kinda hard to mount the camera overhead though)
– Single best move you can make -> Move your camera as far away as possible, then zoom in with OPTICS only, not digital zoom. Mirrorball panos are really cool and easy but biggest con is lack of resolution compared to stitched panos. With the camera far away then zoomed in, you get maximum ortho-ness and also the black-hole (as well as the presence of the camera itself) will be much tinier.

  • As for the edge issues, it’s very important to have a level camera and ensure you trim your image down to very edges of the ball’s edge. Another huge factor on the edge qualities is to use a first-surface mirror. First-surface means the reflecting surface is on the outside, ensuring that any light bouncing from the ball doesn’t get distorted by going through the glass first, both in and then back out. Sure, christmas ornaments are first-surface, but they also have a protective coating and they are very very poor quality surfaces; the glass ball is not very spherical and I ended up with murky and wavy/warped-looking images. I’ve tried to find scientific first-surface ball-mirrors but no luck. Your best bet is a precision-grade chrome-plated bearing, like 1" diameter.

Best results will come from a super-high resolution camera with a quality high-zoom lens.

-BTW, chrome-steel bearings are not as ideal as chrome-plated. Chrome-plated will be almost perfect reflector; chrome-steel is shiny but is not as bright and your images will require more exposure/lighting or monkeying with the brightness/contrast of your image. The monkeying process will introduce more banding in your image so a best-quality ball is preferable.
Good luck!