new wikibook

I looked at the various tutorials around a found that they weren’t what a lot of people were looking for, so I started a wikibook on it. http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/3D_Graphics It is kind of problem that I’m not experienced enough to (probably ever) get it done. Thoughts? I’m very sure this is what the community needs, especially the beginners.

thats great!!! I hope you can get some help for it, :smiley:

A lot. I hope I will not sound too rude and please don’t take the following personally:

  1. If you’re not experienced you probably should not start such a book. It would need pretty much of oversight to make a rational page of contents.
  2. Don’t count on the work of others. You have to do most of the work yourself. If you’re lucky it’s different, but most wikibooks have only a few authors (if more than one anyway).
  3. I may sound like a good idea to create a software independend book. But in fact you’re already relating to the things (modelling possibilities, material and texturing options, lamp types, …) that are possible in current 3D-Software, and probably only to the things that are possible in Blender. This is not bad per se, but you should be aware of that fact.

And now go ahead and prove me wrong :confused:

it takes experience to create what would be a complex section in the wiki. start simple then work your way up. One problem you will find is that many programs use different terms, for the same features. Also there are already many wikipages explaining almost every aspect of 3d both generalized & platform specific.
m.a.

I don’t recall asking for help. As for experience, it’s just that I never usually do animation, so that section wouldn’t get done.

I cannot imagine a beginner getting much out of a wiki that promises to not tell the beginner how to do things. Perhaps some of the generalizations you’ve written about modeling make sense to you, but as part of “the Blender community” I couldn’t make heads or tails of it. It is not what I need, at any rate.

You don’t have the experience to get it done, and you’re not asking for help. What’s wrong with this picture? If you want to help the community, do some updates on the out-of-date tutorials that are currently in the other wiki. The “official” one. The Blender community does not need another half finished one man show, no matter how well intentioned.

Really. You obviously have “issues” with the tutorials you’ve seen so far. Not surprising: everyone, at some point, runs into tutorials that either don’t work, aren’t clear, are outdated or are written at too high or too low a level. So identify specifically what is wrong with those tutorials, get editing permission, and fix them.

The best person to edit a tutorial is the person who has just worked through it, found it lacking, discovered what’s missing, and completed it anyway. I’ve seen tuts where the original author skipped a crucial image, or left out the words “In top view” in the instructions, which made all the difference between success and failure of the person trying to follow the instructions.

IMHO, that’s what the communtity needs.

I cannot imagine a beginner getting much out of a wiki that promises to not tell the beginner how to do things. Perhaps some of the generalizations you’ve written about modeling make sense to you, but as part of “the Blender community” I couldn’t make heads or tails of it. It is not what I need, at any rate.
Well those aren’t remotely finished, nor do I have much time to work on them.

You don’t have the experience to get it done, and you’re not asking for help. What’s wrong with this picture? If you want to help the community, do some updates on the out-of-date tutorials that are currently in the other wiki. The “official” one. The Blender community does not need another half finished one man show, no matter how well intentioned.
I believe their was an editorial by one of the Blender developers on these tutorials not that long ago. Essentially give the man a fish, eat for a day, teach a man to fish… Basically he told them to stop asking for tutorials because that way they would never learn to do things themselves. I’m not asking for help since I know how likely it is that anyone would get help on a wikibook.

Really. You obviously have “issues” with the tutorials you’ve seen so far. Not surprising: everyone, at some point, runs into tutorials that either don’t work, aren’t clear, are outdated or are written at too high or too low a level. So identify specifically what is wrong with those tutorials, get editing permission, and fix them.

The best person to edit a tutorial is the person who has just worked through it, found it lacking, discovered what’s missing, and completed it anyway. I’ve seen tuts where the original author skipped a crucial image, or left out the words “In top view” in the instructions, which made all the difference between success and failure of the person trying to follow the instructions.

The point isn’t to be a tutorial, Its just to force the reader to gain the experience they need by actually doing things and telling them what other people have learned with their experiences. It designed to be a next step after software tutorials.