Newbie questions

I have just began(as in I have just started today as in never worked on anything like this before began) to try and learn how to do 3d modeling and tecturing and such. So I began with a tutorial that was over at blender3d.org

I ended up getting to an excercise to make a sculpture using all of the meshes(except for grid and plan I think). And so I started, but I quickly encountered one giant problems.

Tilting.

I thought it was included in rotation however it obviously isn’t because roation seems to rotate around in a circle rather that a sphere. As in I want to be able to change what is facing where.

How do you do this exactly?

Anda re there any suggestions for tutorials? Is the one I’m using fine? Or is there one that’s really good?

I don’t have an instructor or teacher to help me along so I need something that really explains the stuff.

Rotation happens relative to the view: ie, if you rotate 45* in side view and 45* in top view the object will be tilted in front view. A quick way is to hit R in front view and then MMB (middle Mouse Button) to change the axis of rotation.

Look in my sig for tuts. The ones that are updated for 2.33 are marked as such.

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Wait I think I found out.

It rotates relative to the camera?

That’s kind of annoying but I suppose I’ll learn how to deal with it.

Is there some way of panning without doing the shift + mouse wheel?

Aah, rotating the view, not the object. Look in View >> View Navigation in the header bar.

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In turntable mode (the default, I think) if you start MMB-ing in the center of the screen it will behave as you’d expect. If you start over the left then moving up/down will also tilt it so the left side moves up/down. Starting over the right does vice-versa.

BTW: what’s wrong with shift+MMB to pan? I think Ctrl+NUM2/4/6/8 work too, like NUM2/4/6/8 rotate.

[edit]FYI: MMB means middle-mouse-button (click the wheel)

I am also new but found a way left click at the point you want to rotate, a circle apears where you clicked then press c, this focuses the circle.