Newbie!

Hello all.

I must say that I am a little intimidated by all the good work here on these boards.

I am a Chef right now, and I am considering a career change into something I have interest in for quite some time. This leaves me with a few questions.

  1. I would like to go to university in about 1 year. The program is a continuing education for adults, and you can apply for a certificate when you are finished. The two main programs are Maya and 3DS Max. I am very interested in the gaming circut (Who isn’t?) and was wondering if a certificate will even mean anything once I am finished.

  2. Since I have a year until school (and a mortgage to pay :)) I have taken up Blender to get the basics for 3D animation and Modelling. I am not sure what aspect I like the most. I figure by trial and error I will find out what skills I am best at. Do you all think that this is a waste of time? Should I be concentrating on those other two programs?

  3. I understand that the industy is pretty cut throat. I am used to this. I worked in kitchens for 17 uears. How hard is it to break into this field?

  4. I am embarrased right now to post anything, as I just got through the modeling a stick figure tutorial in the NooB to Pro tutorial. I had a blast with that. Once I figured out how to extrude and grab faces, the modeling came naturally to me.

  5. I am having trouble finding any books on the subject of 3D that are not application specific. Am I crazy, or do these exist?

Thank you for reading my ramble. I hope to become a contributing member you will all be proud of one day.

Cheers,

Sandeman

Hi!

although i am not experiences as many of the other members, i would say that going with blender is a really nice choice.

using blender is risk free, and using it will evaluate your ability to do 3d graphics (which isn’t really everyone’s thing).

if you are making good progress with blender, you will make great performance with maya or max, coz the techniques and terminologies are almost the same.

for books, blender 2.3 guide is a really nice book to get started in 3d with blender.

and yes, welcome to the blender world :slight_smile:

id wait for a newer guide so you can get softbodys fluidsims and the new renderer tutorials & information. but that might not be out till august maybe

blender is good to get you introduced…I used 3d max before I didnt like it…therre are millons of modeifiers you can use and…its just hard to make things with in my opinion…

for example to test out whats better i attempted to make a quick model of yoda…not alot of detail… just a rough model

it took me 1 hour to make it with blender… and it took 3 hours with 3d max…

so learn with blender…when your done with that class…its going to be clear whats easier…(blender)
and a certificate gets you know where… unless its some sort of degree for graphic and game design

That doesnt prove anything, except the fact that you are more knowlegable and skilled in blender :confused:

im sure someone just as skilled in 3ds max could have done it in 30 but hey just an opinion.

there is the manual you can buy off of their website, but im sure they are going to update it soon, but you dont have much time so i would consider buying it. Also there is the blender wiki which is full of tutorials, dont know the site off hand but just run blender and its under the help menu

[quote=“Artaures”]

That doesnt prove anything, except the fact that you are more knowlegable and skilled in blender :confused:

im sure someone just as skilled in 3ds max could have done it in 30 but hey just an opinion.

there is the manual you can buy off of their website, but im sure they are going to update it soon, but you dont have much time so i would consider buying it. Also there is the blender wiki which is full of tutorials, dont know the site off hand but just run blender and its under the help menu[/quote]

…I wouldnt buy a program then not try to master it…wow…im…im speachless…omfg…wtf

Never never never be intimidated by the works of those who have gone befor you.

You should be inspired not intimidated. Don’t focus on comparing your work to theirs. Rather compare the work you do tomorrow to the work you have done today and judge how far you have come…how much you have improved.

Search this forum, and you will see many of the people whose work you admire giving advice and offering criticism to help others along.

Best of luck!

not trying to f*ck this post up but, equilibrium your trying to tell me that a
3,000+ dollar piece of professional software could not outperform blender?

im the one rather speechless…

Its only my opinion, but a 3,000+ dollar piece of software is that price because the people working on it had to get paid. With Blender its free, so it costs nothing. I know that means the costly package has dedicated teams working on them, but there are also dedicated teams (if not full time, dedicated with a passion) working on Blender, and if you take the time to review Blenders history it is rapidly improving in almost every conceivable way. I would rather go with the product whose coders truly love what they are doing, as they are doing it for free.

All 3D programs are based around the same concepts, with differing methods to implement them. I’ve seem terrible renders in both Blender and commerical packages, and visa versa. Its the artist, not the tools, that create the images.

Anyway, just my 2 cents. Oh and sandeman30, I’m new to 3D design myself, but I’m a bit further on. I was recommended the following books on general topics, since you asked in your post, and I’m finding them very helpful to get into the mindset for 3D art:

      -http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1562059548/sr=1-2/qid=1138504669/ref=sr_1_2/103-3489221-8289451?%5Fencoding=UTF8

-http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0735709181/sr=1-3/qid=1138504669/ref=sr_1_3/103-3489221-8289451?_encoding=UTF8

mhm isnt that what I was trying to get the first time?

but hey, he was just referring to his personal workflow, just thought that it was a lil biased.

check this site out, has a lot of great tutorials on it, not blender specific, but im sure you could try to translate it over.
http://www.3dtotal.com/

Back to the topic–
No, you’re not wasting your time working with Blender. Blender has the same tools as the “big boys”, just implemented in a different way. Since you’re looking to make 3D a career, though, you should eventually look into what software the places you want to work at are using.

“3D” is a big field, and some skills are portable from app to app, some aren’t. The fact is, if you can animate a CGI character so that it seems to think, live, and breathe in Blender (more a matter of acting than of tech or tools) then you have skills an animation/games/commercial house is going to be interested in. That’s a portable skill. Same goes (but to a lesser degree) for lighting, texturing, and modeling. If you can do them well in Blender, it’s a matter of weeks to pick up any other app.
This is not the case with rigging, or pipeline tools, or shader-writing, or any of the myriad other application-spacific jobs out there in the 3D world. If the job application asks for your Maya rigging skills and MEL script writing is a part of the brief, there’s no way Blender will help. It might make it quicker to pick up the necessary skills, since at root, it’s all pretty similar (that’s mathematically speaking) but it won’t get you through the door.

That said, there’s other stuff to take into consideration, as well. I assume since you’ve been cooking for 17 years, that you’re at least 30. While this isn’t the case across all fields and all houses, age-discrimination is a factor in some of the “cutting edge” areas like games. The assumption is that an older person with a family will be less willing than someone younger to put up with the crepes that they put you through with crunch time schedules and the like. Not to mention, with teamwork being all-important, you’ll have to work reallllllly well with people whose average age is somwhere south of 25, especially when you’re starting out. Granted, age-discrimination is illegal, and most companies won’t admit to it, or even practice it as a policy, but the fact remains that the break-in level of a lot of 3D is very much a young person’s game. Your experience with kitchen work will likely prepare you for it and give you ideas on how to work within that sort of environment, but it’s best to be aware of it in advance.

So, in sum, Blender is a great tool to get started in 3D, and even make your demo reel if what you’re interested in doing is character animation. If your interests tend more towards technical direction, though, I’d recommend learning more about the field in which you hope to gain employment and see what apps are commonest there. That can easily wait until you’re in school, when academic discounts will make the prices much more reasonable and you’ll have more information and experience to draw on to make your decision. In the meantime, absorb all the knowlege you can, about every aspect of the field. Check out the CGChar site to practice your character animation, read the other forums and magazines to see who’s hiring and what they’re looking for (the latest issue of 3D World magazine has a big article on managing your career in 3D from internship to management. It’s the issue with the green girl by Blanche on the cover).
Good luck!

That said, there’s other stuff to take into consideration, as well. I assume since you’ve been cooking for 17 years, that you’re at least 30. While this isn’t the case across all fields and all houses, age-discrimination is a factor in some of the “cutting edge” areas like games. The assumption is that an older person with a family will be less willing than someone younger to put up with the crepes that they put you through with crunch time schedules and the like. Not to mention, with teamwork being all-important, you’ll have to work reallllllly well with people whose average age is somwhere south of 25, especially when you’re starting out. Granted, age-discrimination is illegal, and most companies won’t admit to it, or even practice it as a policy, but the fact remains that the break-in level of a lot of 3D is very much a young person’s game. Your experience with kitchen work will likely prepare you for it and give you ideas on how to work within that sort of environment, but it’s best to be aware of it in advance.

You are a good guesser. I started when I was 13.

As for discrimination, I am not so worried about that. One thing the kitchen has taught me was to fit in anywhere, and how to work in a team environment. Another is the long hours, and the hellish environment. If any of you have ever seen “Hells Kitchen”, a reality show on the kitchen, I’m telling you that it is very close to what a real kitchen is like.

So, I downloaded the Blender Manual 2.3x (I believe that this is the one that you can buy as well - just to get my feet wet.) I went through the tut for modeling Gus the gingerbread man. It says one hour, but as some things were different, it took more like 2 hours.

One problem I am encountering is the “why” of things is really not explained. Call me curious or stupid, (or both if you like LOL), but I like to know why certain combinations of buttons need to be pressed, as it helps me to remember later that I need to press them.

Here is my first render with Gus:

Gus

I had a problem attaching a material to the buttons on Gus’ body, as these were duplicated from one original sphere. When I went to select each individual button, it selected all of them. After unsuccesful attempts, I just colored them differently.

Perhaps I am missing something.

Sandeman

Thank you for all the kind words.

You’ll be a great Blenderhead in no time!

I had a problem attaching a material to the buttons on Gus’ body, as these were duplicated from one original sphere. When I went to select each individual button, it selected all of them. After unsuccesful attempts, I just colored them differently.

sandman, your problem might be the fact that, when you duplicated [shift+d]
you were in edit mode that means both the original and duplicates are under the same object. Now to fix this would be to take the original, start in object mode and duplicate it, now there seperate objects.

now there is a way to select polys in edit mode and make them into an object of their own, but i forgot, anyone know? (damn blender hotkeys, gotta memorize em all, and looking through the hotkey menu is a b*tch,and yeah i still couldnt find the hotkey)

:expressionless:

Seems I missed that line in the tutorial. I guess I will have to be more careful.

Thank you for the info.

Sandeman

I assume that you’re working with 2.41, then you’d be better of working from the wiki rather than from the rather dated downloadable tutorial.

The gus tutorial there was updated too, makes it much easier :slight_smile:

http://mediawiki.blender.org/index.php/Manual/Manual

ahah! i found it

hey sand man, pick one of your duplicates in edit mode and press the [P] key then press [selected] and voila!

You are a good guesser. I started when I was 13.

Not much of a guess, an old friend worked in a bunch of restaurants in NY. The big question is whether you started at 12 or 13, or went through the “cooking school” route.
Anyhow, I know you can do it. The thing is to be on your toes and be prepared to show your potential employers that you can do it. Even if they don’t ask…

Both. I am a second generation chef. I worked and resisted becoming a chef, until I was 21 and bit the bullet and went to school.

My folks told me last night they were surprised that I did not pursue a career in computers or animation, as the both have always been a passion for me.

I am glad to have all of you here to help though. Makes life a lot easier.

As for the WIKI, there seems to be a lot that is not updated. I will go through that though, as it probably will be easier.

Sandeman

They’re working on that. It’s just that new features keep coming and only a handful of people actually bother to keep the documentation up to date at all times. See also the Noob to Pro wikibook.