OK Linux gurus I need help.


(Homer) #1

OK I just purchased a Visiontek GeForce3 64 MB DDR video card for my 500MHZ PIII system running RH 7.3.
I installed it and when I booted up RH picked it up and installed the driver for it and everything went smoothly. Now here is my delima. I do not notice an increase in speed when I render stuff. If I didn’t know any better I would say that my old card (Diamond vipor ) was still in my machine. I cant even run Tuxracer, although I couldn’t before, I just thought it was my video card that slowed it down. Am I missing a step here. Do I have to recompile the kernel to tell a difference :-? . I hope I didn’t just put a flame to 90 dollars. Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks.


(overextrude) #2

Straight rendering is not a function of the video card- the video card handles things like drawing the interface, and all of the contents of the view ports as you’re working on a scene.

  • Do an lsmod to see if the driver is loaded. (you should see an entry that says NVdriver).
  • Check that everything is linked correctly - I inadvertently removed some GL-related links, and found that Blender was suddenly much slower.
  • Finally, I’d start checking NVidia’s documentation to see if there’s anything special you need to do in order to make the new card work.

(olaf) #3

Check your GLX settings, if the driver loads fine you should see something like:
server glx vendor string: NVIDIA Corporation
server glx version string: 1.2

after you typed the glxinfo command in a console.

You could also type the glxgears command in a Terminal,
the framerates then displaying in that terminal shows you
the performance of the Vid.-Card.
Here on my system Dual-Head Desktop with 24 bit colordepth and a Screenresolution about 1260x1024:

2460 FPS :slight_smile:

HTH, greetz Olaf.


(basse) #4

you have to go to NVIDIA site, and download the latests drivers (kernel and glx) for your system. the drivers that come with redhat, are not hardware accelerated at all, so that’s why you didn’t notice much speed increasement :slight_smile:

if you need more help on installing the drives, once you get them, drop me a mail…

.b


(Grizzly69) #5

Good luck getting the Nvidia drivers to work on RedHat. I tried many times and it never worked. Mainly, I think because RedHat 7.2 didn’t use the XFree86.config file. At least when I tried to find it, there wasn’t one.
It must have had the settings in a different file or something.
I tried Mandrake 8.2, followed Nvidia’s instructions exactly as written and it worked perfectly. My son loves Tuxracer and Chromium. They would never work under Redhat for me.


(acasto) #6

The Nvidia drivers work just fine on RedHat. The name of the file is XF86Config-4 not the standard XF86Config. This is located in the /etc/X11 directory. Although if you have a custom kernel, while the GLX rpm will do fine, you may have to run ‘rpm --rebuild’ on the nvidia-kernel src rpm.

With that, there is only a few settings (in the XF86Config-4) you must change in order to get it to work. It is not hard at all and should only take a few minutes to get up and going.


(Grizzly69) #7

The Nvidia drivers work just fine on RedHat. The name of the file is XF86Config-4 not the standard XF86Config. This is located in the /etc/X11 directory. Although if you have a custom kernel, while the GLX rpm will do fine, you may have to run ‘rpm --rebuild’ on the nvidia-kernel src rpm.

With that, there is only a few settings (in the XF86Config-4) you must change in order to get it to work. It is not hard at all and should only take a few minutes to get up and going.[/quote]

In Redhat 7.2 I couldn’t find XF86config-4 either. I looked all over for a config file the resemble the XF86 config file, I’m telling you there wasn’t one.
In Mandrake both config files were there and that made it simple to get the drivers working. Good luck anyway.


(Timonides) #8

Could I suggest also something else???

Perhaps you haven’t enabled 3D acceleration, on your system. 3D acceleration, isn’t enabled by default on Linux systems when you setup XFree during installation, because the apropriate drivers are still in experimental phase. To do so you can use 3Ddiag, a nice program which will help you to enable it. If you don’t have it, you have to check with Red Hat’s documentation on how it is possible to enable 3d on RedHat systems.

run from the command line:

3Ddiag

The program will run a test and tell you if 3D acceleration is enabled. If not it will tell you what to do to enable it…

skontar.


(PowerMacG4) #9

Worst case (Its best to always do anyway) is to recompile your kernel. I always recompile when I build alinux no matter the Distro of linux. Redhat usually load too much stuff in kernel anyway. When I used to run linux and Geforce card I recompile things run better after I loaded the nVidia stuff. But now when I run linux I stick with ATI cards. ATI handed their source code and hardware specs over to the Linux community unlike nVidia.
When you recompile you get some framebuffer, 3d hardware option and you could take out the stuff you don’t need.


(Kryten) #10

Hello Homer,

Nicholas here: I just installed my GeForce3 card last night. Did you get the same card as me?
Anyway, I am running the card on a PII-400Mhz machine running RedHat 7.3, so what
worked for me should work for you :smiley:

Did you get the latest driver and GLX combo from Nvidia. Also grab their PDF doc. It covers
just about everything you to know. You should not need to rebuilt the kernel; the nvidia driver
is a loaded module. I used the “tar install” method. It is staightforward and understandable.
There is also an ‘nv_check.sh’ script, I don’t know if it is still at the nvidia site. Let me know
and I will post it. It will check your XFree86config-4 file, along with chekcing the driver
and libs.

Basic procedure:
i) install new card
ii) have kudzu change the hardware settings
iii) use Xconfigure to make a config file (i will check the command name when I get home)
iv) make/install the nvidia components as spelled out on page 30 of the NVDIA PDF
v) edit your (new) XF86config-4 made in step iii) (page 31)
vi) (re)start X
viii) use ‘glxgears’ to check you have aceleration

I went from 8 FPS on full screen glxgears to 245 FPS with G3 card on Linux -> a 30x increase in speed!

Anyway, I have played around alot with Linux and Nvidia cards, so email me if you need more help: [email protected]

Good Luck,
Nicholas


(Homer) #11

This is the one thing I am trying to avoid, Although I am not a newbie when it comes to linux, I don’t like mucking with the kernel if at all possible. It takes forever on my machine and I always seem to break something else that worked before. :-?

Thanks for all the suggestiions everybody, I will try tonight to try and impliment the newer Nvida drivers.


(Homer) #12

Thanks Nicholas, I just saw your post.
I will definitely let you know if I have any trouble with the Newer Drivers.

Thanks again everybody for all your input, I really appreciate it.


(basse) #13

hmm… I have had Redhat … hmm since v6.0. and the config files have always been there. if you had the official Redhat packages, then XF86Config and XF86Config-4 are in /etc/X11.
and EVEN if not, it would be easy to create them there, and just point your X to the new config file.

NVIDIAs geforce-drivers work like a dream. I upgraded to 8.0 yesterday, downloaded source RPMS, compiled, installed, voila… blendering continues…

.b


(Homer) #14

AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH
AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH
AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH
AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

I HATE LINUX, I HATE LINUX, I HATE LINUX

OK for those of you who love LINUX let me state that I for one use Linux and very much want it to succeed. I do not like micro$oft and do not want to rely on it. BUT WHY THE LINUX COMMUNITY AND DISTROS GET THEIR COLLECTIVE HEADS OUT OF THEIR A$%es I will never know. All I wanted to do is install a hardware device (a graphics card). I have a dual boot machine and this task took me 10 sec with win2000 (I timed it) I am now going on 2 hours with linux. I followed the instructions to a tee as per the users on this forum and per the instructions on Nvidia’s site. What happens, I’ll tell you what happened, X IS [email protected]%*!ING broke.
I just went back and read acasto’s post and I am not sure but this may have been where I got off track, but I really dont know. I changed the Xconfig-4 file just as the PDF instructions said. I installed both RPM’s, just as the instructions said. The only thing I didn’t do was acasto’s suggestion for the kernel rpm rebuild.
But I want to vent a little more, Linux will never catch up to M$ if they keep this crap up. Who wants to go in and edit Configuration files for christ sake. I do it because, well I guess I am just a Masochist. :frowning: And whats the deal with RH. Do they have something against tuning the desktop for 3-D applications and hardware? Truth is I am so frustrated right now I can’t see straight. I mean linux is/was a fun hobby, but how can Linux possibly get any market share with this kind of lousy interface. And why RH has to put its energies and money into a common desktop, JUST MAKE IT WORK, IS THAT SO FRIGGING HARD. BTW if anybody has a better distro that actually has multimedia apps and is tuned for the hardware on your PC please let me know.
Again please understand, I really want Linux to succeed, its just that now instead of being a hobby I want LINUX to be my main OS where I can actually do real work, instead of tweaking my system for 6 months to get it to run the way that I want. :x And right now I am very frustrated.
If anybody has any other ideas I could try to get X working again I would appreciate it. I am work now and will try acasto’s suggestion as soon as I get home, but I really don’t know if that will fix my problem.
BTW when I say X is broken I mean when I try to start my X session it never comes up, it goes back to the command line saying that it could not start X.

Thanks for letting me vent and for everyones responses so far.


(PowerMacG4) #15

You might have to remove the X trash and reinstall. Being its RH, try putting a cheapo card in and let that kudzu thingy run. then reinstally the Redhat card. If you really want to use linux get a distro like Debian spend a HELL of a time building it. install all the things you want.
My real advice is to get a SGI machine or Powermac. Stick with SGI though.


(Grizzly69) #16

Homer, as I said earlier, I never could get the Nvidia drivers to work under Redhat. I was able to get them to work with Mandrake 8.2 no problem. I also happen to like Mandrake’s tools and setup much better than any other distro I’ve tried (RedHat, SuSE, Mandrake).
Did you run the NVchooser.sh shell script to be sure you had the right RPMs for Redhat?

Thats what I had to do to make sure I had the right RPMs. After that, I followed the Nvidia instructions and expected failure (like I had with Redhat), but surprized that they worked.

I like linux, KDE desktop, and many other things about it, but I have yet to see a signifcant advantage of running linux over Windows. Programs I use like Blender and Gimp don’t seem to run any better than the windows version (actually Blender runs better for me in Win98). I’m not pro M$ but all the things I do can be done easier in Windows. DV capture, multitrack recording, TV tuner (ASUS doesn’t make linux drivers for its TV tuner cards), all my games, scanner.

DV capture in linux is still quite new and undeveloped. I have yet to find any multitrack linux app that even works let alone compares to Cool Edit Pro or Quartz AudioMaster.

I could go on and this could become another Linux vs. Windows debate. Thats not what I’m trying to do. If you are more like me and just want to use applications instead of messing with stuff to get programs to work, then stick with what works already for you. I do linux as a hobby and each time I try a newer version it keeps getting better. But I have yet to see it replacing Win98se as my main OS.


(Homer) #17

Yeah Grizzily69 I didn’t want this to become a window$ Vs. Linux debate, but you might be right. I will still try to get this to work in linux, but so far as actually getting work done, I might just go back to windows (dammit :x) and every so often load another linux distro just to see if there are any improvements that would make me want to try and switch again. And I really hate that because I am not a quitter, I just don’t have time anymore to screw/fight with the OS to try to get it to work, I would much rather have the OS work so I could learn the App. so I could start producing something worthwhile and spend more time with my family.


(slikdigit) #18

grizzly69 wrote:

In Redhat 7.2 I couldn’t find XF86config-4 either. I looked all over for a config file the resemble the XF86 config file, I’m telling you there wasn’t one.
In Mandrake both config files were there and that made it simple to get the drivers working. Good luck anyway.

that’s weird. I have the nvidia drivers in redhat7.2, download version. XF86Config-4 is in /etc/x11 (don’t remember caps at the mo’)
I just installed the redhat rpms for my distro. Ran fine. I use blender all the time (geforce3ti500) and its pretty darn snappy.
maybe your running XFree 3.6 instead of 4? 7.2 does come with both.
PS I later updated to XFree 4.2 from the 7.3 rpm. woiks fine.


(acasto) #19

Calm down man… why not set up a dual boot. Then let your linux distro evolve into something elegant enough for you to use. Eventually you will notice yourself hardly ever booting windows, and the frustration won’t be as bad because you are reliant on it to work right away. So you can have a little fun ‘exploring’ Linux. You may even try a few distro and reinstall a few time before you get a decent setup in which you feel comfortable with. Don’t try so hard, just have fun. It will work out in time as you grow more accustomed to it :wink:


(Homer) #20

Calm down man… why not set up a dual boot. Then let your linux distro evolve into something elegant enough for you to use. Eventually you will notice yourself hardly ever booting windows, and the frustration won’t be as bad because you are reliant on it to work right away. So you can have a little fun ‘exploring’ Linux. You may even try a few distro and reinstall a few time before you get a decent setup in which you feel comfortable with. Don’t try so hard, just have fun. It will work out in time as you grow more accustomed to it ;)[/quote]
acasto I already have a dual boot machine. I was just hoping that I could get on Linux full time and ditch M$ altogether. I have calmed down a little bit since this morning but I guess this was the last straw. As I said, I will fool with this thing until it works but I am just very very frustrated with Linux right now, and will probably spend a lot of time porting all of my files, pics, music, blend files, wing files etc etc over to windows so I can really start to try and produce some artwork instead of dealing with Linux itself. And its not like I am new to Linux ( I have been playing with it for about 3 years) like I said before this was just the last straw. Mabey I should buy a Mac :smiley: :o 8)
Thanks again for the responses.