Physics And Maths, Compulsary for game programming


(rav_bhara) #1

Who does physics or maths here, I do think they will help for game programming, my mate was saying there was a situaltion where he had to find the gradient of a floor to he had to kow diffrentiation/integration stuff. Im doing them but i just wanted to know does n e 1 else do those subjects aswell and are they a definate


(acasto) #2

Well, physics and math are extremely relevant. Actually, I seen a couple books up at Barnes & Noble that was titled ‘Physics for game development’ that was nothing but a bunch of equations and such for game applicable physics. Also, just being able to flip over to that alternate logical mindset would help a lot :wink:


(Kid Tripod) #3

Physics A level was the best thing i ever did (academically)


(IMProvisar) #4

Yes, physics and math are very important for game programming. (more so in some games than in others).

For instance, a game I really loved a long time ago called “Scorched Earth”. Essentially, there were a few tanks sitting on a rocky horizon (2d game). You set the cannon angle and power, and try to kill the other tanks before they kill you. Showing the path of the projectile, and whether or not you hit the enemy tank… all ballistics, which is all mechanics, which is a subset of physics, which requires math.

Yes, physics and math are very important for game programming. (more so in some games than in others).

Imp


(Waffler) #5

We use to play Scorched Earth all the time! There’s a certain tank that you could make fly by driving left and right over and over again … I think it was a bug.


(nerddogs) #6

I have a degree in math and a minor in computer science.


(pofo) #7

:slight_smile: Physics and math… yes I’ve heard of them.

(Maybe spending five years on them is a bit more than what’s needed for games, but I think it’s worth it)


(overextrude) #8

I’d argue that math is required for nearly anything to do with 3D

  • inverse kinematics
  • various functions used as bases for textures
  • scaling
  • lighting
  • reflections
  • 3D entities - nurbs, meshes, bezier curves, and others.
  • geometry

It’s all math.


(iluvblender) #9

now i repent that i should have done well physics and math at school.

anyway i am starting over again.


(Cessen) #10

Who does physics or maths here, I do think they will help for game programming, my mate was saying there was a situaltion where he had to find the gradient of a floor to he had to kow diffrentiation/integration stuff. Im doing them but i just wanted to know does n e 1 else do those subjects aswell and are they a definate

Math is a must for game programming. In fact, math is a must for any kind of computer programming.
Basic physics would also probably come in handy, though I suspect that the really advanced stuff isn’t necessary unless you want super accurate physics in your game (specific relativity, anyone? :wink: ). A good background in Newtonian (spelling?) physics is probably a good idea.

I’d argue that math is required for nearly anything to do with 3D

  • inverse kinematics
  • various functions used as bases for textures
  • scaling
  • lighting
  • reflections
  • 3D entities - nurbs, meshes, bezier curves, and others.
  • geometry

It’s all math.

You could generalize that to computer science in general. :slight_smile:

But putting aside all pointless, psuedo-witty comments, I would like to dispute your saying that it is “all math”. You forget that there are still the underlying concepts, many of which do not require math to visualize. For instance, when you think of a ball, do you think of “Sphere: a surface made up of all points that are a set distance away from an origin-point.”? Well, perhaps you do :wink: But I think of a “roundish thingy-ma-bob”.

The same type of thing applies to 3d graphics concepts. You can either think of them conceptually, or you can think of them in terms of their formal mathmatical defenitions. Both ways of thinking about them have their uses (indeed, where would computer graphics be without math!), but one must always remember that the mathmatical representation (almost) always stems from the concept, not the other way around.


(overextrude) #11

I don’t think my post was very clear, and I can see where the confusion might have originated. The original comment focused on programming. When I said nearly anything to do with 3D, I meant nearly anything to do with 3D-related programming.


(IMProvisar) #12

Hehe… I’m almost done, and I’ll have a degree in computer science… if I had taken one more dinky math class I would’ve had a minor in math too… just not enough time. As it is, for a math minor in my school, you must have 6 upper-level math courses. 4 upper-level math’s are required for the BSCS (Calculus 1, Calculus 2, Statistics, and Discrete Math). I took Math for Decision Making (sounds lame, but the book title is “Quantitative Mathematics for Business”, or something similar… not the fluff class I thought it was, lol). One more and I would’ve filled the requirement… but I hope to continue education long after I get my degree, so the specifics down on paper aren’t really that important to me.

Hehe… I think I played an older version than yours… I don’t remember being able to move the tanks. :slight_smile: For a hint: I played it on a 286, lol.

Imp