Project proposal: tutorials on paper

I’m very new to blender and I’m currently searching the web for each and every blender tutorial that I can find. I have already found an incredible amount of usefull tutorials but also loads of dead links to stuff that has been online, but no longer is. So I’m starting to grab everything I can find and print it, but I want to have it in some decent format so I decided that I’m going to make a nice page-layout to cut-and-paste each tutorial. Together with a good index it will be quite a nice compilation to have…

So as I was thinking about this I started thinking that it would be nice if others could have this too. I’m going to put a fair amount of time into the compilation, so why not share it with the community :slight_smile:

So here is my proposal: I will start creating layouted PDF-files of the tutorials that I’ve found. When I have one finished I will put it up for download, but only if I get permission from the original author of the tutorial. The downloads can be on one of my own sites or maybe we can have a section on blender3d.org or here on elysiun for this.
I will also have an uptodate index available as PDF at all times.

First thing we need to think about is how the tutorials are listed in the index (I need that because the index needs to be referenced on the documents).
I’m thinking about this:

  • Modelling
    • Simple (beginner)
    • Medium
    • Complex (advanced level)
  • Texturing
    • Simple (beginner)
    • Medium
    • Complex (advanced level)
  • Lighting
    • Simple (beginner)
    • Medium
    • Complex (advanced level)
  • Rendering
  • Animation

… and so on.

Ideas and suggestions are welcome, as are permissions to include your tutorial(s) :wink:

i’d have loved somthing like that when i started seriusly with blender two years ago… i think many ppl new to blender would appreciate things like that!

[>] so, keep going and good luck

marin

http://www.elysiun.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=13380&start=60

They got the axle and one wheel already.

%<

Actually, that is another thing alltogether. You see, my bookmarks folder is also already acting as a database with links to all kinds of tutorials. The problem is (as I stated in my first post) that no matter how organized you make those links in a database, they still remain to be links to sites that might dissapear. As I said, I found loads of dead links, meaning those tutorials already have vanished from the web.

So every tutorial I can find I’m going to put into a nice printable format and put it in a binder. If the website goes away, I still have the tutorial, not only on paper but also as a PDF. I also like paper versions as you can read through them while not behind your computer, or you can put them nicely besides your keyboard (reason I ordered the blender manual while most of it is available online).

I see no reason why both options can’t exist besides eachother 8)

I’ve been thinking of doing pretty much the same thing for a while. I have a lot of tutorials bookmarked, but sometimes they go away. I went through the tutorials 1-2 years ago and printed everything I could find. I have the printed tutorials, but most of the time I didn’t download any accompanying .blend files.

A standard format would be good. Another needed item is to update all of the old tutorials to the current user interface.

The tutorials should be indexed for beginner, experienced and advanced, but also for the category and technique along with keywords, e.g. Beginner; Animation; Keyframe Tutorial; keywords: Blender 2.3+, keyframe, IPO curve, animation (original tutorial by: xxxx, updated for Blender 2.3 and used with permission by xxxx)

You do have a point there. The accompanying .blend files should somehow be made available at the central download site as well. I will think about a way to organise this.

A standard format would be good. Another needed item is to update all of the old tutorials to the current user interface.

I was thinking about that too. It will be a great deal of additional work, but I might combine it with my learning of blender. I was already thinking of replacing the screenshots in certain tutorials as some have very bad resolution graphics.

The tutorials should be indexed for beginner, experienced and advanced, but also for the category and technique along with keywords, e.g. Beginner; Animation; Keyframe Tutorial; keywords: Blender 2.3+, keyframe, IPO curve, animation (original tutorial by: xxxx, updated for Blender 2.3 and used with permission by xxxx)

I don’t think keywords are of any use as the main goal is to produce printed versions, although I think what you are getting at and it might be a usefull addition. Also, adding the disclaimer ‘used with permission…’ is a good suggestion. I’m already working on the layout template and I’ll include as much as is usefull. The layout is fairly simple, made with OpenOffice so maybe when the template is finished I can publish it as well so other people can produce tutorials in the same layout.

Also, it’s logical that when I create a PDF-version of someones tutorial, the author automatically gets the right to put the PDF on their own site in return.

you also have copyright issues to deal with, so when you are making and distrubuting copies you will have to get the copyright holders permission.

simon

[/quote]
whoops… !

Why not write the tutorials in LaTeX? That way they’d be publisher-quality :slight_smile:

I know how to script in LaTeX… should I take this up?

it’s off-topic, but tell me - what exactly is latex? i always think of “human-readable-postscript”, but not sure if this is quite it…

marin

Not quite… it’s a scripting language though… it has a LOT of history behind it. It’s a build on to the almighty TeX program (considered possibly the only bug-free program in existence). I type my papers in LaTeX (using emacs as my text editor), then compile them. They look much more efficient.

You can do more than just write essays and books in them, though. I created door decks with video game characters in a simple LaTeX script. But really, if you’ve ever read an O’Reilly book, it’s written in LaTeX.

More info here.