rendering bright light

The other day, I was looking at the wallpaper on my desktop (desktoppaper if you will :)) Anyway, this is a fragment of it:

http://members.lycos.nl/eenpersoon/posts/sunny-flower.png

As you can see, it’s a pink flower. You can also see that the picture was taken on a very sunny day. Parts of the flower that look very bright are overexposed, making it look white. Take the shadowline I marked for example. The color in the shadow is pink, the parts of the leaves in the sun are white. However, to the eye this white does not seem white, because of the surrounding pink. It seems like very bright pink.

The thing I was wondering is, can this be done with blender? I’ve tried to illuminate a purple object with a light set to 10 energy, the brightest possible. This does not give the desired effect. The material gets the maximun amount of purple. The color is not overexposed, which would make it white.

For transparent materials one can use the “add” value. This works well in particle animations for fires for example. But is something similair also possible for normal materials? I haven’t been able to get the effect I want.

Multiple bright lights?

you might want to try specularity (white/pale pink) with a very low hardness… I think that would work

Try the area light, I always get it to make over exposed effects

The arealight and spec trick did it. Thanks :slight_smile:

Yeah, what you gotta do there is to get a blending of color. And you have to decide whether you’re looking for the effect to be as it appears to the eye or as it appears to photographic film.

We shot a lot of outdoor effects indoors, where the lighting is much easier to control, and there were always several lights, always colored. Most of the perceptible color in such images actually comes from the light, not from the object.

Yeah, what you gotta do there is to get a blending of color. And you have to decide whether you’re looking for the effect to be as it appears to the eye or as it appears to photographic film.

I’d like to get the effect of photographic film. And that would be done though overexposing I think, because a monitor/tv/whatever can’t display the dynamic-range (very dark to very bright) of light that the eye can see, so you have to simulate.

But I’d like to know more. You say you use collored lights. What kind of color is needed to get the look of a sunny-beach? And aren’t feature films for example post-processed to get the effect over overexposure?

You know sunlight is not white…It is lots of colors together ROYGBIV! man!

Make multiple lamps with all the colors and see what you get.

R-Red
O-Orange
Y-Yellow
G-Green
B-Blue
I-Indego
V-Violet

ROYGBIV :stuck_out_tongue: One lamp wont do what your trying to do

You also have the option of the exposure setting in the world buttons.

%<

"It is lots of colors together "

that is what white is… all the colors together =P

The easiest way to do this would just be to post-proccess the image in photoshop, the gimp or some other photo suite.

Select the bright parts, and then you can adjust the light values so they turn white, and “bleed” off onto the non-bright parts.

You could also try breaking the model into two layers, and then assign each lamp to only affect the layer it’s in.

Then have a really bright light on one layer, and a softer one on the other… I don’t know how well this would work, but it might.

I am not sure if this had been mentioned, but it should work if you were not useing a pure purple (in example, green set to zero). Try having a little of all the color componants. The lights need a color to multiply by (light=<1.0 ,1.0 ,1.0>, material=<1.0, 0.0, 0.8>, resulting color=<1.0, 0.0, 0.8>).

I am not sure if this had been mentioned, but it should work if you were not useing a pure purple (in example, green set to zero). Try having a little of all the color componants. The lights need a color to multiply by (light=<1.0 ,1.0 ,1.0>, material=<1.0, 0.0, 0.8>, resulting color=<1.0, 0.0, 0.8>).

That helped as well. And it’s fairly logical too, now that you mention it.

As for the rest, I’ve been fiddling a bit. I think the best results are those created by The GIMP, meaning postprocessing works better then setting the materials/world properties. Now I have to start experimenting with the gimp animimation package (gimp-gap).