resolution problem

whenever i render an avi jepg it comes out with really low resolution.
could someoe explain this?[/i]

I was having the same problem. The best i can figure is in the render settings turn the OSA on and press the 16 button down. That will help the objects resolution out, but in my experience the background is still poor quality especially if you use a background with that fades to a different color. I have no clue how to fix that, does anybody else?

but in my experience the background is still poor quality especially if you use a background with that fades to a different color. I have no clue how to fix that, does anybody else?

If you are getting banding in your background (happens in 24 bit colour but is really noticable in 16 bit colour) don’t worry to much because the blender render window doesn’t do any dithering. Once you open the picture in another app like photoshop or the gimp the banding will be gone.

As for the original post I can’t tell what is wrong because he doesn’t tell us what settings he used or even show a still image of one of the frames.

GreyBeard

you see ive tried nearly all the settings, and any kind of avi compression always comes out pixelated. but stills or a series of stills look fine.

For serious animation purposes you should render image-squences. The creation of media-files like AVI or quicktime is always the last step in such a project.

If you don’t want to spend big bucks on the Adobe Creative Suite you might want to try your luck with Jahshaka.

Another alternative might be rendering BMPs and combining them to an AVI using VirtualDub.

Either way, a real workflow for creating animation always uses some compositing tool to add a final touch to everything (filters, multiple layers, color correction etc.). Rendering an AVI-file directly is always a bad idea and only viable for preview-purposes.

I agree. I output each scene, or layer thereof, to a subdirectory as a series of .TGA files. Each piece into its own subdirectory.

When you’re working with these in the Sequence Editor, “Add…Image” then AKEY=Select All. Blender recognizes its own file-numbering system and treats the entire collection of images as a single strip.

I really recommend using PNG instead of TGA. Both are lossless but PNG has a better compression factor.

Martin

That’s fine, and a good tip. The key idea is that you want to keep each individual frame in a separate file, where “compression within the frame” is fine but there is no attempt at “compression between frames,” and that you should make those images nice and big until your final output is ready to be run.

It’s also generally important, if you intend to do any sort of compositing (even titles or credits), that your file format supports the Alpha channel and that the Alpha channel output is in fact generated (RGBA button).

Information, once lost (e.g. through compression) can never be re-gained. Every operation is “like moving around piles of sand on the ground … it loses a little sand (data) and picks up a little dirt (noise).” You want to carry as much of that original data as long as you can, and discard it only once, and very deliberately, at the final step.