Rounding Text Heavily

Sorry for asking such a simple question, but I’m a newbie and I’m getting frustrated trying to do something I would consider rather simple.

I want to make some text look very goopy, almost like a liquid - having the edges of the text be rounded a lot. Using just the regular bevel on some extruded text doesn’t look goopy enough. I found, by searching, a tutorial here:

That references converting the text to a mesh using ALT-C, then removing duplicate verticies (w, remove doubles), and then running a filter called limited dissolve (space, then type limited disolve)…

It really cleans up the font just fine.

But I can’t figure out from here how I can get the edges rounded more.

Do I have to go in and bevel every edge or face by hand to get the desired effect?

you can give it a bevel with the curve buttons while it’s still a curve.

Sorry, there’s no button “Make my text awesome”. :wink:

First, a tip: “Limited Dissolve” as well as all the Dissolve functions is now located with all the Delete functions. Just press [X]!

The tutorial is a bit old… But it goes in the direction of what you want to do: Convert to mesh, remove doubles, limited dissolve.

At this point, with a more recent version of Blender, you’ll get big Ngons in the front and back of the letters. Select them all (in Face mode) and press [I] to inset. This will give you a nice ring of quads all around the Ngons. Now, you can set the whole text to Smooth and add a SubSurf modifier.

Cut the big NGons into smaller faces and tighten your mesh around the sharper corners. Use [J] to join 2 vertices across a face or the knife [K] followed by [Z] to cut across the whole mesh. (Adding edge loops doesn’t work well will the Ngons.)

The Bevel tool now also works so much better… Use it to cut the edges. Use the mousewheel to have at least 2 segments or else you might get a lot of nasty triangles.

You can even use the Smooth tool to make the letters rounder.

The only thing to remember is to keep the big Ngons and their ring of quads relatively flat… or else the SubSurf modifier will make you some horrors. :wink:

At some point, when you stand back, you might see something like this:


This is Blender’s default font… more or less. :eyebrowlift:

That is definitely the direction I need to go in. Thank you.

I am lost at this point though:

"Now, you can set the whole text to Smooth and add a SubSurf modifier.

Cut the big NGons into smaller faces and tighten your mesh around the sharper corners. Use [J] to join 2 vertices across a face or the knife [K] followed by [Z] to cut across the whole mesh. (Adding edge loops doesn’t work well will the Ngons.)"

I’m using the Impact font, and the word DARK. Using the subdivide surface takes away too much of the font edges from what I see on my end - it looks nothing like what you ended up with. So then, I’m curious what you mean by cutting the faces up? the D, A and R are already divided into two faces each (which for some reason it will not allow me to merge the two faces on each letter into one big N gon)…

Let’s take the e for example in your example… are you saying cut the e around the curved portion of the front face approximately 9 times (as shown in your picture), and then applying a bevel modifier to the entire face?

I am such a newbie unfortunately that I am not able to follow along at the moment. Again, what you did is awesome. Thanks for your help.

Blender doesn’t support Ngons with holes… yet. That’s why you must always have at least one edge going from a hole to the contour;

Any way, that’s not a problem because you must cut them further. To prevent the SubSurf modifier from destroying the shape of the letters, you must “tighten” you mesh, i.e. to add edge loops close to the tips and close to the crossings, in every place with sharp angles.

In your very specific case, here is what I’d do approximately:


The red lines represent the edge loops that’s I’m sure I’d add. The green ones are in case the corners aren’t sharp enough.

My rule of thumb to cut the big curved faces seems to be: No more than 1/8 of circle per face.

Here is a clearer example of the kind of work I suggest:


No bevel, no smoothing here. Just inset and a few edge loops. (I highlighted the big letter faces in orange and the ring of quads created by the Inset tool in blue.)

And if you want to use a bevel, you must select edges only, not faces! You don’t want shading artifacts across the faces… :wink:

Last thing: If you didn’t notice, I cut the letters in half and used a Mirror modifier so that I needed to do only the front side.

To be continued… I’m working on a tutorial about just this kind of stuff.