setting up new computer?

(zdk1) #1

to preface: I don’t know all that much about hardware related issues so please bear with me.

so my old desktop died a while ago so I bought parts for a new system.
the parts got here last week, except I forgot the heatsink, so I ordered that. Turns out, the heatsink was just slightly too large for my case, so I ordered a new one.

anyways, the real problem is that I am trying to reuse the hard-drive from my old system. As far as i can tell the hard drive is fine. It has Win XP installed on it.
Ideally, I just wanted to stick it in the new machine and be able to run XP.

So I stick it in, it shows the XP symbol, then immediately blue screens.
The hardrive shows up in the BIOS though.

What I really want to do now is to format the hardrive and reinstall XP (I’ve backed up the files that I need). however, I stick in the XP CD and it reports that it can’t find the hard drive.

I stick an ubuntu live CD in the CD tray and load ubuntu. I can access all the files on my old hardrive so its obviously readable. I could format it with the ubuntu CD and install ubuntu, but I do want to eventually install XP.

Anyways, the hard drive is a SATA hard drive, its powered and plugged into SATA 0 on my motherboard.
random other info:
proc: core 2 duo 2.33ghz E6550
mobo: Intel DP35DPM ATX
the other stuff i can’t see being relevant.

The XP is a “reinstall CD” that I got with my old system (an out of the box Dell system). That could be the problem?

So either:
something simple is wrong and one of you can tell me what I’m doing wrong so I can fix it.
Somethings wrong with the hard drive and I need a new hard drive.
I can’t use the reinstall CD and I would need to buy a new copy of XP (on that note, is XP 64bit any good? ).

my original budget was $900, after sorting out the heatsink stuff etc I’m just about there. Getting a new hard drive or a new copy of XP would put me over but I might be able to live with it (college student, so I’m not really made of cash).
anyways, any thoughts?

The components I bought seem good and in working order (much more powerful than my old system). Its just a problem with this re-used hard-drive and/or XP.

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(Mmph!) #2

jesus chr!st.

Dont do that!!!
you need to install windows from scratch so it can build the kernel for you system. You are lucky you have nor ruined your system with the old drivers.

just install windows on your new hard drive, later on plug in the old hard drive to recover your files.
after you get your files copyed over, I recommend formatting the old one.
one other thing…

most modern hardd drives have what is called a auto cable select.
Your old HD may have had teh jumpers set as master…
you will want to move the jumper pin to eiother cable select, or slave.

hope that helps

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(zdk1) #3

sorry, I guess I wasn’t clear.

I only have one hard drive, the old one. I pulled it out of the old system.
on an additional note, The drive has no jumper on it at all. does it need to be on there? I wasn’t sure if SATA drives needed one.

Some more information.

I can put the harddrive back into my old system and it will boot up XP just fine (the system is unusable for other reasons). This makes me think that the OS and harddrive are fine, but there is some other reason why I can’t either boot it or format it.

I do have a spare hard drive, but it has no SATA connections, just an IDE connection. I could pull the jumper off that if I need to.

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(Mmph!) #4

it is loading the kernel for your old computer, that is why it is crashing.

If you get a blue screen,that means the HD is working fine… just the OS is not compatible with the new system.the OS just needs to be re-installed to make it work.

when you install windows, it specially compiles the kernel to match your processor and motherboard.

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(zdk1) #5

ok that makes sense as to why I can’t just load it.

my problem is that I am trying to reformat the hardrive and install windows XP for the new computer, but the installer keeps telling me that it can find no hard drive at all, when it is clearly there.

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(Dan) #6

Ok, first off, SATA drives and controllers are not recognised by windows XP out of the box. In windows setup, you need to press F6 to install additional drivers, before the XP install process actually begins. There is a prompt, normally at the bottom of the screen ‘Press F6 to install any Third Party or RAID drivers’ - something like that. So in order for XP to recognise the drive, you will need to make a driver disk (on a floppy).

Normally there are SATA controller drivers that come on your motherboard driver cd. There should be a folder somewhere on that CD called ‘sata driver disk’ or some such name. If you’re not sure, google the model of your motherboard with ‘sata driver disk’ at the end and you may find what you need.

Sata drives do not have jumpers - the only thing you need to worry about is plugging it in.

Also, it’s unlikely that an XP recovery disk will be able to install a fresh system. To see is the installer runs, you’ll need to set your bios to boot from the cd. If that doesn’t work, check to see if there is a setup.exe file in the root directory of the XP cd. If not, then I don’t think you can use that to install Windows. There are other options available in that case, one of which is buying a copy of XP. The others, well, you catch my drift.

You could also try and install on your IDE drive, as that will be recognised by the Windows installer. Also, do not use ‘Cable Select’ - that is a very specific setting which requires a special cable.

Basic rule for IDE master and slave. Master devices on the end of the cable - slave is for devices in the middle of the cable. So master would be your hard drive on the end of the cable, slave is cd rom in the middle of the cable. Or if you have two ide ports on the mobo, you can plug the hard drive as master into the Primary IDE, and then the cdrom as master onto the Secondary… Most likely your new motherboard may only have one ide port…

That should cover most of what you need to know.

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(Mmph!) #7

hmmm, this is odd…

Do you have a knoppix, or any other live CD?

If not get one…
http://www.knopper.net/knoppix/index-en.html

boot that up and see if it can find the HD.

the old windows XP installer disk cannot see SATA drives… durring the loading, you have to hit F6 and load the driver manualy. SATA came after they made XP.

I think the newer versions of windows have SATA drivers (service pack 2 version)

here are a bunch of tutorials on the subject:
http://www.google.com/search?q=install+windows+on+SATA&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

EDIT:

HAHA!
Dan beat me to it :smiley:
Nice one Dan :smiley:

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(zdk1) #8

okay, Dan is correct I think. Thanks for all the info. I did get a RAID AHCI driver floppy disk. I can’t find anywhere on my mobo to put in the floppy drive connector though?
its smaller than the IDE port.

anyways, i was fiddling with BIOS and now the XP CD can see the hard drive. I think I set the SATA mode to IDE, whatever that means (it was previously set to RAID).

I imaging RAID is better so if I can figure out how to get th drivers on there that would be better. Like I said, I can’t see where to put my floppy drive connector though, unless it goes in my single IDE port which is right now connected to my CD/DVD drives.

If the RAID thing doesn’t matter, I’m perfectly fine with just reformatting and installing.
I can now format with the XP CD and install windows, I’m just not sure if I should be concerned with this RAID/AHCI thing

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(Dan) #9

Ah yes, forgot that there is a compatibility mode. Also, RAID is only for when you have 2 or 4 or 6 etc… SATA drives… They work in pairs to increase performance, among other things.

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(zdk1) #10

ahh ok. I only have the one drive so that is not an issue for me. I’ll just format and install then.

thanks a lot for your help, both of you.

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(hessiess) #11

you could try running a linux distro, most of them are free of charge, and its almost 100% imune to virases/mailwere/worms/spywere etc

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(zdk1) #12

yes i know. Like I said originally though, I use many programs, games etc, that run on Windows. For work and recreation.

I do do a lot of work on unix systems. I do at least half of my programming on unix (we have a bunch of red-hat clusters here at my school).
I really like Visual studio/Visual C++ on windows though.
Besides, I never said I wasn’t using linux, I didn’t burn that cd just to stare at it.

ubuntu seems like a nice distro.
I probably won’t dual boot right now due to lack of total HD space, but I probably will later. No reason to “switch” when you can just have both, you know?

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(MrRage) #13

If you use the windows CD to repair your install you typically can recover from moving from one hardware platform to another. My installs been though 3 different motherboards over the last 6 months - same install and its working fine and has a low boot time.

Keep in mind this process still takes time.
To do it, boot the CD - skip the initial repair prompt, select your install and select repair - be careful on what you do from here. If you mess up you could wipe your drive. Basic rule of thumb - if it says format, don’t say yes.

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(zdk1) #14

hmm, thats interesting. So you mean its the same installation? Without reformatting and reinstalling? I’ll give that a try. worst case it gets formatted which is what I was planning anyways.

EDIT:

awesomeness, the repair installation went just fine so I have the same windows installation from before without reformatting, sweet. well, it was getting kind of cluttered. a reformat might not have been a bad idea…

anyways, thanks all of you. I really appreciate it.

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