So many "Painting" modes

Hi all,

I’m trying out more advanced uses of textures and I’m quickly getting myself confused.

I’d like to apply textures to parts of a mesh in an “organic” way with the different textures smoothly blending into one another. I can select pieces of the mesh and apply a new material with new textures, but the different materials/textures wouldn’t smoothly blend into each other across the boundaries of the pieces of the mesh.

I’m a bit overwhelmed by the Vertex Painting / Texture Painting / Weight Painting modes and they appear to be different enough topics that I’m finding it hard to find docs/tuts that clearly define what each mode does. It appears weight painting can be used for a variety of things, but I can’t tell how I would apply them to texture mapping.

Any advice or just a previous post I missed?

Thanks

Heres a link to the blender manual that tells you all about differant methods of painting your mesh
link>http://mediawiki.blender.org/index.php/Manual/Painting

Probably the best way to achive the smooth blending effect you want is to uv map a quick discription of this ,Its like doing a drawing on a flat piece of paper and then wraping it around your model.

Vertex painting mode = You can apply a single colour to single vertices.

Texture painting= after you have uv mapped your mesh you can paint directly on the mesh surface

Weight painting= this is used to control strength of other features the colour range from blue to red which is a value from 0 to 1 ,These values are used by armatures,particles,softbodys(thats all i can think of a moment but there maybe some more)

Thanks, Hazza, for the pointer. I’m beginning to understand the different Painters, but I’m still unclear how to achieve the effect I’m looking for. I was hoping I wouldn’t need to use UV maps for what I want to do. And I don’t see anything in the manual or any tutorials on how to combine UV coordinates with something like a “cloud” texture in the way I want.

Here’s a specific example and maybe you can see how I could get the effect:

I am trying to texture a sphere so that the poles have one combo of materials and textures (say a woodgrain appearance), but the equator has another combination (say some combination of noise and clouds). All I really need is some way to blend across the two in the Z direction. Or an alpha map of some sort to use with the equator material: zero at the poles, one at the equator. I thought I’d seen a video somewhere about weight painting the vertices to get the desired blend between two materials, but now that I want it I can’t track it down.

I don’t understand colorbands well enough, but I don’t think you can use them as an alpha map on the mesh. If you can, I’m not sure how you’d control the direction of the colorband on the mesh. I haven’t figured out exactly how to control the direction of the Blend textures.

I have played with many different settings in the texture Map To buttons. The closest I can get to what I’m looking for is to adjust the z size and the size of the texture itself. But that would be a very limited solution.

Ok you can try using a stencil in texture position 2 that will blend between your two textures in position 1 and 3.
Heres a tutorial on using stencils
link>http://feeblemind.tuxfamily.org/dotclear/index.php/2005/02/27/16-didacticiel-usage-des-masques-de-textures---tutorial-using-texture-stencils

You can use a blend texture to make the stencil and use colourband to alter the position of the blending between to two textures.
heres the link in the manual about colourbands
link>http://mediawiki.blender.org/index.php/Manual/Ramps

If the colourband is a bit confusing still, for now until you get to grips with it you could make the stencil texture in a 2d program.

The stencil function looks exactly like what I’m after. The tutorial looks very useful! Thanks, Hazza!