Sunlight Altar

Well, another fantasy setting that i did. trying to find some ways to improve it
render in BI

Attachments


how about using a spot lamp with volumetric halo

hmmm… I guess I had some what of success


Hmmm… kind of a small render. It looks like you have some major texture stretching along that stone rim that circles the base of the statue, though it is kind of hard to see. As far as the picture itself goes. It is looking ok I guess. I will say here that a picture like this is not at all my style of picture, but honestly, the picture looks kind of bland. My reaction is, “Hmm, statue… thing, pavilion in the sky? Umm, its ok… decent render I guess…” Hope you don’t mind me being honest. The lighting is really fairly boring also. I guess personally, I might make the gazebo enclosed so you can’t see the sky as, to me, it is kind of distracting. Then add some lights or torches around the walls and have the main illumination coming from those. Or maybe have the main lighting be a shaft of light coming through a window in the roof.
Well, hope you didn’t mind my opinions! :slight_smile: It is an interesting picture. I’d like to see where it goes.

Okay, how about this?


Nice render. May be its little bland? How about adding some light rays!

http://www.photographytips.com.au/images/ray-of-light-photo-technique1.jpg

adding some spot light with halo


did some work on the floor


Wow, very nice. The new floor looks great too!

You need to attenuate those sunlight beams coming through the back window because they’re blown-out white.

Consider compositing the shot together: the blazing altar, but the mottled blue on all sides of the stained glass. Deal with them separately. That ought to make that altar “pop!”

This same technique would also let you deal with the floor, to keep it from going opaque-black anywhere. One, two, three. Altar, stained glass, floor. Shaken, not stirred. Then, mix to taste, should equal “Wow!” That altar’s gonna look like it’s full of pure-white fire.

(Waxing creative now…) Then take that white fire, blur it, split into three primary-color channels, desaturate each one, shift 'em slightly left-or-right and maybe through a lens filter, blend it back with the fire and now you’ve got a white-plus-multicolor fire that ought to look positively godly, and you did the whole thing “in post.”