The price of competitiveness

Someone I know from another forum just came up with an interesting preposition:

it takes approximately 10 000 hours of practice to achieve world-class mastery in nearly anything, which works out to about four years and ten months of 8 hours a day, five days a week practice.

Could be. Does that sound right to you? Do you think this applies to Blending as well?

For anything, it doesn’t matter the length of your exercises, but the quality.

Interesting. Hope there is some debate on this matter.

I’ve heard the 10,000 hours thing before. Sounds about right. I haven’t been doing 8 hours a day for that many years, but it’s around the 5 year mark since I started doing any amount of 3d.

I don’t really want to look at the work I did when I started as I’ve improved a lot, but I don’t feel ‘world class’. Not yet anyway. But if I had done solid 40 hour weeks of nothing but 3D since the 2nd to last year of high school instead of finishing high school / uni / various jobs then it’s possible I guess.

Get back to me in 2-3 years… :slight_smile:

There is the thing where some people pick skills (3D included) up much quicker than others, but I still think 4-5 solid years can’t be discredited. You might pick up heaps of skills but take years to get better concepts/ideas. Or you might have a great idea and it takes you 3 years just to figure out where to start on it.

I think the statement is far too broad.
There are far too many Human Variables such as Age, Intelligence, Genetics…
Some people study 20 years to become Masters of their field.
Others are naturally gifted, so the time is lessened.
Is every High School Student a Master of Education, after four years?
Will a person with Genetic weightiness become a master Gymnast?
Can a person with a low IQ achieve Mastery?

However, the truth in the statement is that if you are Dedicated enough and choose to follow an endeavor that you are capable of achieving, then yes.
That much practice should/will bring you to a very high level of skill in that field.
Mastery? It is a very strong word, usually I associated with lifetime achievement.

Is every High School Student a Master of Education, after four years?
I think CubofJudahsLion is stating learning just one thing instead of a broad range of topics.

eg: if all you did in high school was learn math over the period of four years, non-stop - you’d be a mathematical genius like the top few percent of people the world (but most likely a total noob with other subjects)

However, the truth in the statement is that if you are Dedicated enough and choose to follow an endeavor that you are capable of achieving, then yes.
That much practice should/will bring you to a very high level of skill in that field.
sounds about right :smiley:
you can always learn more, but there comes certain points in life when your skills plateau, and you just become faster, more efficient, and better at them :)…

does it apply to blender? well… I’ll have to disagree with that one… there’s a boatload of options that keep on expanding (seemingly expanding almost at the rate our universe is expanding) every time I look, there seems to be a new feature, eg: the node editor, sculpting mode, particle re-write, the blender-internal getting better, more scripts, FFMPEG, Grease pencil, etc

therefore, I think blender would take more time to master than the time alloted for “regular” mastery (since blender keeps on expanding) , and the needed time for mastery would increase as time goes on and more features are added.

I think CubofJudahsLion is stating learning just one thing instead of a broad range of topics.
I wouldn’t want to take credit for such a statement! But I think you’re right – it should be immediately apparent that it’s referred to disciplined practice applied to a particular field.

You know how those truisms go: nobody can verify them, and since they “kinda feel right”, they are often quoted. Personally, I concur with those who think that there are too many variables, and that makes testing this ‘truism’ unfeasible – which I’m sure the “guru” who came up with it calculated.

Lastly, it’s possible that buying into this 10000 hours thing may be counterproductive: it’s very tempting to judge your progress according to a simplified scale by an author of these crayon-coloring guides to life instead of seeking educated criticism and self-criticism.

Forget about those 10000 hours. Become an eternal student.

Depends on what you mean by world class…

World Class is totally subjective. Then there is the fact that once you reach the world class level, mediocrity shines 10 fold. What do you call the guy who’s above average in a room full of geniuses?

I think it applies to everything in life. Just work hard. Love what you do. And if you end up in this class of the world, all the better.

I don’t think there is a set amount of time though. For one guy to reach his peak could take 10000 hours, and another guy takes 6000. For the gifted it might take 3000. Then there are the truly freaky who seem reach what one would call world class in time lower still.