The question.....

Here is an interesting question for all you braniacs out there:
ok i’m walking home from the grocery store, and it starts to rain should i;

  1. Run to get home faster and therefore get less wet.
  2. Keep walking normally, so the rain doesn’t splash on my face and all over the front of me.
  1. Bring an umbrella next time

No, i’m serious, it’s killing me i can’t figure it out.
also it’s scientific, not logic.

  1. Duck into a cafe’ until it clears or lightens up, meet a girl there in the same predicament, chat and laugh for a moment on how drenched you both are, introduce yourself, buy her a warm cup of hot chocolate, and meet the love of your life.

'Cos if if you do, you may be able to nut this one out…
I’ve heard the question asked many times over the years, though have not come across such a dissemination of the subject. Those guys, what-cha-ma-callit - The Myth Busters did a segment on this question a while ago, though their answer seemed somewhat unsatisfactory and a bit more ‘sexed-up’ than scientific. If you would believe the answer given by the second gentleman below, you’re in for a head-busting episode of mathematics and empirical evidence gathering to solve this… :yes: - Care to factor in variations of wind velocity and localized ‘wet’ and ‘dry’ spots? How about different drop sizes…

Answer #1
http://www.physlink.com/Images/graypix.gif
A close friend of mine, and I actually performed a test on this. We put a cardboard sheet over our head and one in front of us. We walked over a 10ft space, it was a light drizzle so we would be able to count the number of drops that hit the sheets. The amount of rain drops that you will get hit by (in idle conditions, the area each person walks is equally dense as far as rain drops) is exactly the same whether you run or if you walk, as long as the time you are in the rain is the same.

The reason for the fact that you are hit by approximately the same amount, is because when you run, you are hit from above with less rain drops, however, with your forward velocity increasing, you hit more and more rain drops head on. As long as the time in the rain for both people is the same, you should get a close to equal number of rain drops. However, a person who sprints 100yds as opposed to a person who walks the 100yds will get hit by much less rain, because of the time it takes to travel the same distance.

So as a straight answer to your question, yes you will get hit with less rain drops if you run (bearing in mind there must be a significant difference in speed or difference (to change time) than if you walked.
http://www.physlink.com/Images/graypix.gif
Answered by: Cody

http://www.physlink.com/Images/graypix.gif
Answer #2
The empirical evidence presented notwithstanding, it seems implausible that the number of raindrops hitting a person per unit time remains constant whether running or walking. The answer posits that running will cause you to hit more raindrops on the front per second, with which I agree, but claims that you will be hit less often on the top, with which I disagree on the following grounds:

As a horizontal piece of cardboard moves forward, drops that would have hit it go behind it and thus miss. However one would expect an equal number of raindrops that would have fallen in front of the cardboard to now hit.

Therefore taking front and top into account, running should cause you to intersect more drops per second than walking, but will take less time to cover a certain distance. How these 2 effects balance out remains to be seen.

Mathematical models which assume raindrops falling vertically in planes with randomly distributed drops within the plane show the two effects to balance out perfectly, but the real life application? Who knows…
http://www.physlink.com/Images/graypix.gif
Answered by: Robert Landolfi

(Aspirins not included. Please consult your doctor if pain persists:D)

EDIT: Wait - I think PapaSmurf has THE answer for this question…

you get wetter faster when you run, but you are in the rain for less time so you stay drier.
Source: National Geographic “Mythbusters”
m.a.

Here are my thoughts: It depends on how close you are to your desitination. If you’re within sight of it, yes, run, and maybe you’ll escape a little bit of wetness. However, if you’re at all still far away, just walk if you don’t mind being in the rain, because you’ll probably be just as wet in the long run (no pun intended).

Hmm… great thoughts guys, thanks, that should put my brain to rest :wink:

Heh… Get a raincoat and a hat. :slight_smile:

for me , i like to get wet from rain :slight_smile:

an umbrella

hey PP , you should have mentioned it’s color , lol .
yeah , and it really matters wether it is pitched or not ! lol
but it is an umbrella after all , … :slight_smile:

They did this test on Brainiacs Science Abuse. Turns out running causes you to get wetter.

It’s yellow. :ba:

Walk between the raindrops. Geez its soooooo obvious.

Yes, either that or put up your antimatter tachyon field.

Don’t tachyons break physics by going faster than light? Then you’d have a bigger problem than being a little wet… For ultra-scientific proof of this, it was on the first episode of “Eureka” on the Sci-Fi channel. :smiley:

well this one depends entirly on the direction that the wind is blowing cus i have never seen rain fall straight down it is allways blowing in one direction or the other also this has had some flaws in it up until now and that is the assumption that the rain isnt acting like normal rain where it starts out at a light drizle and then gets heavier and heavier with the wind situation if there is rain there is at least a slight breeze causing the rain to go more in one direction than the other if you run into the rain logicaly you will get wetter however if you run the same direction the wind was blowing you would assume that you will get less wet and also i think in the long run if you run you will be better off cus no one waits until the middle of a rainstorm to start running or heading for shelter they start when the rain starts and if you start running when the rain starts then you will most likely be able to get inside before it starts to rain real heavily as opposed to walking and getting caught in the climax of the rain storm and getting drenched

walk between the rain drops - silly.

Goodness, everybody seems to have their own ideas! thanks for the thoughts anyway!