Theatrical Lighting

Background:
Been using blender about 2 weeks. I think I have a good handle on basic modeling and how to apply multiple materials to the same object to get multiple colors/textures on it. Now I am looking for something in the real of lighting. I have taken about 2-3 years of classes on Theatrical lighting and have been a photographer for many years. So I would hope that background would give me a leg up in designing atmospheres in Blender. Anyways.

Couple questions. First is there a newbie of the newbie lighting guides that someone would suggest? I have read the documentation on it and it seems like a review of what I have learned from photography/theatre and not really how to use the blender system efficiently.

Second. The way to get a texture or diffusion in theatre is to add a template to the light and voila you have a break up/diffusion. Could this technique be used efficiently in Blender or would it be more likely there are tools that are already installed into blender to give such effects but I am just unaware?

That’s about all for now from the newbie. Thanks in advance for reply/advice.

-Eric

Edit 1: spelling/typo
Edit 2: Oh right I forgot to link to gobos and to see what they actually are if someone is unfamiliar with what a theatrical gobo/template is.

http://www.stagetechnology.com/catalog/items.cfm?RS=46

This is a piece of metal placed right at the focal point of the light to get a diffusion. It can be adjusted 2-3 inchs or 5-7.5cm to either have a hard or soft focus on the object the light is projected on.

You can add a texture to a light, which gets ‘projected’. A black and white image should be perfect as a gobo. Alternatively you could turn on shadows and have a real 3d object in front, but that’s not a very efficient way of doing it.

So us a procedural texture or can I map one of the pictures to be a texture on the light? Such as using one of the pictures from the link but cutting it down.

You can do either. Here’s a wheat gobo from your link with a soft edged spot light. Adjust the size X, Y , Z values to make it fit your lamp. I also had to paint the white borders of the image black. I just opened it in a UV/Image editor window and used the paint tool. You’ll probably need to enable the “Clip” button when you load the image texture as I believe the default is “Repeat”. Since you’re into the lighting effects you may also want to try one of Broken’s QMC Ray Tracing builds to get soft shadows for other lamp types. www.graphicall.org

.

Attachments


http://wiki.blender.org/index.php/Manual/Lighting_Rigs and previous page for a description of what each type of light does.

You can do either. Here’s a wheat gobo from your link with a soft edged spot light. Adjust the size X, Y , Z values to make it fit your lamp. I also had to paint the white borders of the image black. I just opened it in a UV/Image editor window and used the paint tool. You’ll probably need to enable the “Clip” button when you load the image texture as I believe the default is “Repeat”. Since you’re into the lighting effects you may also want to try one of Broken’s QMC Ray Tracing builds to get soft shadows for other lamp types. www.graphicall.org
So for that quick picture you put a plane infront of the light and then put the texture on it? or was it something else? Also your quickie render is exactly what I was looking for/trying to accomplish. Thanks so much for showing me that is can be done.

Beautiful. Put it on the list for reading after work.

No. I added the texture directly to the light itself. Select your light and press F5 for the materials buttons, click Add New on the Texture and Input tab, then go to F6 and add an image texture.

Thanks for the tips and techniques. This will add a whole new dimension to my renderings when it is combined with a nice rig. Thanks so much for the advice.