Tips for modeling indoor scenes? (i can't see what i'm doing)

I mean sometimes when i work on a scene that’s an indoor scene, I have a hard time being able to see what i’m doin. I’ve tried wireframe, changing the viewport display in the object properties to wire for certain things (like a ceiling), and I’ve just tried hiding object. But it always feels very claustrophobic. anybody have any other suggestions?

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Make the wall normals face inward and then enable backface culling.

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Are you modelling everything as a single mesh?

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i think i see where you’re going with this. Separate meshes would help. Like i said, sometimes i hide objects, so yeah i separate objects to hide them sometimes or put them in wireframe mode, but other than that i was wondering if anybody had any other types of tips that maybe i hadn’t thought of. It’s not just modeling. Animation sometimes i want the envoirment there for reference while I’m animating but it gets in the way of what I’m looking at at the same time.

Well, a good rule of thumb is to model everything as a seperate mesh that is a seperate thing in real life as well.
As for stuff getting in the way: Well, that is something that unfortunately happens all the time. It makes sense to organize your scene so that you can quickly hide stuff. For example put all exterior walls into a collection so you can hide this collection when needed.
Or if you need these walls for orientation you can display them only as bounding box.

Otherwise using the “random color” in wireframe mode makes work in wireframe mode a lot easier when dealing with lots of objects.

Another way is keyframing the visibilty of the offending object. That way you can hide/unhide them with by pressing the arrow keys. This is only useful for objects you have to hide/unhide very often.

If you have objects that form some sort of “unit” it might make sense to put them into a different scene and palace them into a collection there and then just put them into your main scene as a linked collection. That way you can reduce object clutter.

But yeah, it is mainly about good scene management.

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Also if you find it hard to navigate the viewport with an indoor scene, use the walk/fly navigation mode to move around as if you were in a first-person-shooter video game

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Another thing to consider is Blender’s very-fundamental concept of "[between-files …] linking."

As long as you are very careful to keep things like relative scale in mind, you can very easily focus on “just one object at a time” in any scene which involves multiple objects … as, of course, nearly every scene does. Then, you can “link to” these assets, using so-called proxies to represent them and even to animate them. Now, the total process of “creating the scene” has been subdivided into more-manageable steps.

This notion has been with Blender since the very beginning, so there are gobs of tutorials and web-pages which discuss it. (Several “Blender movie” projects have included a “cattle call” asking internet contributors to contribute “props” which could be linked into every scene that needed them.)

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When I’m doing interior stuff. I always make the floors, walls and ceilings as separate objects so I can hide hem when needed.

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