Two Parts: (1) Foot sliding Walk Forward? (2) How to bring up IK/FK panel in property

Been trying to internet search a solution for an entire day (hours upon hours just trying to find some type of solution). I’m not going to be able to move past this until I get some type of resolution.

(1) Foot sliding. Looking to create a walk forward animation without foot sliding. Yes, I’ve done the search on this forum. Can anyone do a brief walk forward with the blend file? Doesn’t have to have the best walking motion (can always polish later on), but for now, I just want to know how to keep the feet planted on the ground with no sliding.

Now, if I simply use the up arrow key to jump from keyframe to keyframe, it looks perfectly fine @0:22 to 0:28 or so). It is when I press play (or hit Alt + a) that the feets starts sliding.

Note: I haven’t done any rigging exercises yet, so any technical terms about what to do will likely go over my head. My main focus is on animation, but if I must then I will do some tutorials on rigging later on. But as of right now. The foot sliding is holding me back.

Walk forward as oppose to walk cycle because walk forward will be important in stationary background (i.e. bedroom, living room) as seen in some portion of this video:

(2) How do I bring up the IK/FK panel. I even tried to follow this guys tutorial and I still can’t get it to work. I’m wondering if bring up the IK/FK panel can also help stop my foot sliding.

The rig needs to be able to run the python scripts that create the panel. Make sure you have turned on the AutoRun Python Scripts in the user preference panel. As far as foot sliding, you need to “nail” the feet in place (put a hold on them lol) and move move the pivot bone that moves everything but the feet. Here is an example you can follow if you have correctly rigged it. If it is a long walk you can use a cycle offset on root (http://www.cgmasters.net/free-tutorials/offset-an-animation-cycle-in-blender/ ). If it is a few steps, just animate the walk and the pivot/hip bone. Using IK feet. If you can’t figure it out, post your blend that you are using.

Checked under user preference and the “autorun python scripts” was checked. Watched the video you linked, but I simply can’t get it to work. This thing is stumping me big time. This rig is from blendswap.com and is not mine. I’m looking to dive right into 3D animation as opposed to focusing too much on modeling.

Not sure how to put a “hold” or “nail” the feet in place.

http://www.pasteall.org/blend/42720

Here’s the original download file: http://www.blendswap.com/blends/view/14445

It works fine for me. Did you save the user preferences when you closed the window?


Foot slide can be fixed in the graph editor. Also, having the keyframes set to Auto Clamped can reduce any unintended overshoot on keyframes.

If you would like the best animation tutorial for Blender, get The Animation Toolkit by CGCookie. It’s authored by Nathan Vegdahl (the rigger behind many Blender open movies and also the author of Rigify) and Beorn Leonard (an animator for many Blender open movies and also an animator on some big screen films like The Lego Movie.) You will not regret it.

Good luck!

Edit: The foot slide is because you are mixing the root control location and the hip control location. Use just the hip and the foot controls, leave the root bone stationary. It’s not needed to move the character for what you are doing (walk cycle).

I’d go with Dan’s advise, he usually is spot on. Another reference which does a great job if you are not into video training is Tradigital Blender by Roland Hess. You can usually pick up a used book for around 10 to 15 US dollars.

I managed to get the IK/FK tab back open. Not exactly sure how. But it happened.

I actually tried following this tutorial (
https://cgcookie.com/archive/blender-animation-fundamentals/ ) Specifically the walk cycle. When I deleted all the keyframes, so that I can start from scratch, the foot slides while walking. There was this one part in the video where he keys frame 1 and frame 2, as he drags the slider across the timeline, the character doesn’t move (no inbetween frames, but once he presses play, then the character would properly animate), however when I did the same, I saw the character start animating, and ultimately results in the sliding foot.

My initial instinct yesterday was to actually look at the graph editor. I isolated just the left foot and looks like the foot is sliding in the Y direction. I tried adjusted the curve any which way, but it seems as though nothing really worked. I’ve come across the Toolkit, but I don’t believe it talks about the forward walk cycle.

I actually prefer video tutorial. Much easier to digest and follow and replicate. I’ll take a look at the book by Roland Hess.

EDIT: Wondering if I should just give up on the walk cycle. Spent another couple hours trying the CGcookie tutorial on a walk forward and the feet still don’t stay planted to the ground. They simply keep sliding.

I don’t know what your animation skill level is but I’d suggest stepping back from walks for a while and doing some simple tests just to get the hang of controlling movement in Blender. Things like the different types of keyframe, blocking out actions, using the graph editor, etc. You can have a lot of fun just bouncing a cube around if you put your mind to it.

Animation Fundamentals is a great tutorial. The rigs you are using are pretty good, but there are a few odd things that may be throwing you off. The foot roll seam a bit odd to me. I would expect it to roll the foot and bend the toe, and it does not do that.

I agree with 0ldScratch. Maybe take a step back and go through all of the preceding sections with the simple rigs, then move onto the walk cycles.

Also, you might want to try the CGCookie Flex rig instead. It will behave more like the Clive Rig Beorn is using and it will be used exclusively in the Toolkit tutorials. A bonus is there are a lot of customizable variations in that rig and you’ll be able to create a character more to your liking.

Good luck!

I don;t find walk cycles to be hard, once you go through the process a few times. Since you prefer video tutorials, here’s one that’s easy to follow…