Washed out colors after using sequencer

(wigglyframes) #1

HI! I am actually cutting a movie using the blender sequencer. Win23/Blender2.59. The sources are avi(raw) movie files - made with blender. They look fine in the preview window. But after exporting (rerendering) the completed movie I have washed out colours in the final mpg - see picture. What i am doing wrong?

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(JO5EF) #2

Try rendering out just one frame as a png. If there is no color change in the png, you should play around with the encoding settings.

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(turbochimp) #3

This is maybe because you are editing in video colorspace. Its not rgb anymore then, its yuv and every video player is doing the conversion back to rgb (pc monitor) a little different. Try to avoid changing the colorspace in production. Blender ist rendering in linear colorspace and saves you image as 8bit rgb (depends on the file format). If you choose video the output will become yuv. You can also choose to save your renders as exr and stay linear but then editing in the sequencer will be to slow to use. Even with disk arrays blender is to slow to handle exr playback.

I recommend saving still frames as 8bit tiffs. You can edit them nicely in the sequencer. If this is not working on you machine (playback issues) try jpeg sequences with quality at 100%.

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(wigglyframes) #4

Thanks for your answers. OK, i have been told that it would be better to render in single frames, but the problem is that i do a longer movie - its about 35 minutes long. So it has more than 50000 frames in total. Can Blender handle such an amount of frames?

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(chipmasque) #5

Rendering to .avi raw also creates gargantuan files, with no image compression. You can compress TIFF losslessly, but also PNG, which is more efficient at compression & uses the same color space.

For editing, consider using proxies of one form or another rather than the actual image sequences. Blender’s default Timeline Length maxes out at 14000 frames, so you may have to edit in separate-file chunks, choosing hard transition points (cuts) for the divisions between chunks. You could then output separate temp .avi files for creating a master edit to review. If Blender chokes on lots of long .avi files, consider trying VirtualDub to splice them together. You can also use it to mux your a/v if need be.

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(Nagy Viktória) #6

Hey!
I have the same problem but I always render animations frame by frame, in PNG, and I was told to use the Quicktime container with H.264 codec when I render the frames with the Sequencer. What is there to do in this case? I tried playing with the color management but I just don’t really know how to use it yet (or it’s not even the best solution).
The rendered frames look like this


Yet the Sequencer makes them like this

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