What to do with unused meshes in an animation

I’m an absolutely newby in the modeling animation area, as I’m mostly programmer for a D3 mod and I do the modeling only for what I need to test my code until I get the real versions from our artists (in case you want to know what game this is you can look here The Dark Mod and if you are interested in joining as we can always use modelers, animators and other kinds of artists of all levels.

So now to the question: I wanted to create a little trailer that bascially uses some text fading in out. Now I wondered what I should do with the object while I don’t need them For example I start with the first text, fade it in, fade it out and then I want to do the same with the next text showing up. Is there some established workflow on how to do this? Or do I simply move the mesh out of sight and the move the new one in.
Also I wonder how to do the traditional credits role. Do I simply write all the text top to bottom and then move the camera along it?

I know that I can do it this way, I was just wondering if there is a better way to do this, or how the pros do it.

Thanks for your patience with me. :slight_smile:

??? If an object is faded out (invisible) then it can remain in the scene where it is. Or am I missing the point of your question?

You could move it to an unused layer. The purpose of the layers is to help organize your work. You can have more than 1 layer selected and choose which layers will be included in the final render.

What I would do, given the option, is to add the titles in an entirely separate render and combine it with the existing footage using the Sequence Editor (Video editor), as a post-production step.

It does not make sense to me to have to re-render a scene just to change the title that is superimposed on top of it. That’s an obviously two-dimensional step for which a video editor is ideally suited.

Thanks. That’s a good idea.

[quote=“sundialsvc4”]What I would do, given the option, is to add the titles in an entirely separate render and combine it with the existing footage using the Sequence Editor (Video editor), as a post-production step.[quote]

Actually I wanted to avoid that. I’m only doing small things and I’m not very familiar with all the tools that I will need. But I think for the final movie this might indeed make sense.

Definitely dive-in and learn the Sequence Editor. It really isn’t difficult, and you’ll use it a lot. Search this site for some of my various posts on “compositing,” “alpha,” and so-on.

I happen to be doing a large project on a painfully small and slow computer. So I break down each and every camera setup into different slices from front to back … foreground, mid-ground, background … and composite them together. For example, if the camera isn’t moving (and usually it isn’t), the background slice consists of exactly one frame, rendered once and repeated for the entire shot. If a machine in the midground is twirling at 60 RPM and therefore has a 30-frame cycle (30 fps), it’s animated for exactly 30 frames, using exactly the amount of motion-blur that it requires, and repeated for the entire shot. Every single thing is done that way.

And, usually, when the shot is finished there is something about it which needs to be tweaked. And so I go in, tweak whatever layer needs to be adjusted, re-run the Unix utility make to re-render the affected layers and re-composite the shot, and in a few minutes the shot is ready to be reviewed again.

This has been more than a lifesaver. For an animation job of any length, I think you simply have to do it. You can afford (maybe…) to spend a few hours looking at a new version of a still magnum-opus, but not for animation.

%| (shuffle, shuffle…) yeah, I know, the tutorial … workin on it… (mumble…)